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Larry Miller, former Ampex electrical engineer/designer and one who has sat on several networking 
protocol standards committees, has written extensively on the Ampex list about error correction and 
the robustness of error correction protocols. I believe it is unrealistic to expect too low an error 
rate in burned dye media, but the error-correction has proven very robust over time. Not to say a 
trashed disc is not a trashed disc, but to say we should not make too much of tiny errors that are 
easily corrected and accepted in the protocols just because we can detect them.

-- Tom Fine

----- Original Message ----- 
From: "Mike Richter" <[log in to unmask]>
To: <[log in to unmask]>
Sent: Thursday, December 07, 2006 7:54 PM
Subject: Re: [ARSCLIST] The ways CD's and DVD's can fail.


> Tom Fine wrote:
>> Hi:
>>
>> I did switch to water-based pens a couple of years ago, once I started doing more work for paying 
>> clients. Any clients of mine on this list, rest assured no Sharpies were used on your disc media 
>> I've done for you. However, I do believe this is a phantom menace, at least in my experience. But 
>> since water-based pens work just fine, why be the lab rat to test a would-be myth?
>>
>> -- Tom Fine
>
> It's not a myth. I've seen the effects, but only on very thinly coated media. Whether a heavier 
> acrylic would be penetrated given more time, heat or humidity is speculation.
>
> Incidentally, Jerry has reported that any writing on the disc's surface (presumably, without heavy 
> overcoating) is detectable in his error testing. What seems not to be proved is that that 
> deterioration is significant in practice. I am not skillful enough to write legibly only on the 
> central annulus where there is no burning.
>
> Mike
> -- 
> [log in to unmask]
> http://www.mrichter.com/
>