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----- Original Message ----- 
From: "D. Blake Werts" <[log in to unmask]>
> ----- Original Message -----
> From: "Steven C. Barr(x)" <[log in to unmask]>
> > ----- Original Message -----
> > From: "D. Blake Werts" <[log in to unmask]>
> > > Thanks Steven for the suggestions.  For me, database schema definitions
> can
> > > come later.  <snip>
> I hear you loud and clear.  It just seems to me that if I'm already typing
> notes into the database, and I have the source material right there in front
> of me, why not go ahead and get the rest of the information if it is at my
> fingertips?  It sure would be a much quicker job if only capturing label,
> catalog number, and publication name/dates--agreed!
> 
> Is there a medium ground then?
> 
Well, since you're designing (and as such, defining) the project...
that's YOUR call! It would be possible (if you have a good typing
finger, anyway...?) to create, or try to, the "ultimate" database...
from which, by using well-designed queries, you could then take
the necessary data to serve as an "(Almost) Complete Classical
<format(s)?> Record Dating Guide...

In any data-related project...be it database creation, cataloguing,
useful HTML page(s), usw...the data entry is always the "Killer"
task. It's slow, tedious, and very hard to automate to any useful
extent...and worse yet all but demands a fairly complete knowledge
of the material involved, if only to avoid the sort of screamingly
obvious errors (using titles for composer names or vice versa,
entering data that couldn't possibly exist, and so on...) that
are immediate tipoffs the work was done by folks who had no idea
WHAT they were data-entering!

Steven C. Barr