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I probably have 5 copies of Damn Yankees. Hope one of them will be good, 
but each one is probably better in different areas. When I did the Naxos 
issue of Brigadoon, I worked from 3 LP copies and a 45 set. Ya never 
know. Anyway, got a list? Off-list if you like. I'm looking for some 
pretty obscure items myself, like 'Clara' (had it, taped it, sold it, 
regretted it).

dl

Roger and Allison Kulp wrote:
>  Yeah,but what if you got a bunch of "too obscure to be saleable" OC Lp-s ?  Would they want them ? I have a pile I would like to see get a good home.
>
>                                       Roger Kulp
> Steve Ramm <[log in to unmask]> wrote:  
>  
> Someone JUST sent me this from back in June. Thought I'd share if you  hadn't 
> seen.
>  
> Problem is that- based on this article - folks are going to want to donate  
> their copies of "Jesus Christ Superstar" and "Damn Yankees" to the Library of  
> Congress!
>  
> Steve Ramm
>  
>  
> Record-Eagle com 06/09/2006
>  
>  
> A little something extra from the extra 
> Man donates his renowned library of recordings 
> BY BOB DARROW 
> [log in to unmask] (mailto:[log in to unmask])  
> Record-Eagle/Douglas  Tesner 
> Just a portion of David Hummel’s huge recording  collection is pictured here. 
> TRAVERSE CITY — If walls could talk, David Hummel's would sing show  tunes. 
> If walls could breathe, they'd gasp for air in Hummel's Traverse City home,  
> where the rooms are lined with shelves jammed with a vast collection of 
> American  musicals performed during the last half-century. 
> Six thousand record albums. Thirty-five hundred compact discs. Five thousand  
> tapes, on both reel and cassette. 
> Hundreds of reference books, including one Hummel authored himself. Thousands 
>  of playbills from Broadway shows. 
> "I had to have everything show-related," said Hummel, a former recording  
> engineer and consultant who recently decided to give it all away. 
> By Tuesday afternoon, it'll all be gone, donated to the Library of Congress — 
>  from recordings of hits like "Jesus Christ Superstar" and "Damn Yankees," to 
>  obscure flops like the Gene Kelly-produced "Clownaround," that sit amid 
> stacks  that wrap around corners and into bedrooms. 
> It's simply not enough to call Hummel a collector or hobbyist. It's more of a 
>  way of life for someone who acted as an extra in musical productions in the  
> 1950s. So keen is his passion that a curator at America's official library 
> calls  him a "highly-recognized expert." 
> Musical composer Stephen Sondheim, whose credits include classics like "West  
> Side Story" and "Sweeney Todd," characterized Hummel's recordings collection 
> as  "perhaps the most complete and accurate catalog of the American musical 
> theater  currently, or perhaps ever, in existence." 
> Hummel never had his musical cache appraised. He intended to donate the  
> recordings to the Library of Congress upon his death, but recently moved up the  
> giveaway date. 
> "I just decided I'd like to see it happen," Hummel, 71, said. "I'm not really 
>  listening to it that much anymore." 
> On Tuesday Denoyer Brothers Moving & Storage will come to Hummel's home,  
> carefully box his thousands of recordings and send them to a Washington, D.C.  
> storage facility. 
> >From there, the collection eventually will make its way to the Library of  
> Congress' new state-of-the-art National Audio-Visual Conservation Center in  
> Culpeper, Va. The records will be digitized so researchers can listen to them  
> remotely. 
> Not only did the Library of Congress accept Hummel's donation — now  
> officially referred to as the "David G. Hummel American Musical Theatre  Collection" — 
> the staff is excited to have it, said Librarian of Congress James  
> Billington, who in a letter thanked Hummel on behalf of the nation.  
> It's not often the library receives so complete a collection from an expert  
> in his field, said Mary Bucknum, the library's sound-recording curator. 
> "Mr. Hummel's collection is quite spectacular," Bucknum said. "He's giving us 
>  many unique pieces we didn't already have." 
> Of particular value is Hummel's collection of bootleg recordings of Broadway  
> performances, often made by someone with a tape recorder in the first row. 
> Many  of those recordings are the lone copies in existence; some composers asked 
>  Hummel to send them copies of shows even they don't possess. 
> Hummel owns nearly every LP related to musical comedy ever produced, and  
> amassed the collection sifting through mom-and-pop record stores around the  
> state and nation. 
> "Back in the day, going through the bins was so much fun. It was amazing the  
> stuff you would find," he said. "Winning a bid on eBay just doesn't  
> compare." 
> Hummel lost interest in collecting as Broadway began to cater to more  
> serious, elaborate productions. 
> "The fun went out of it," he said. 
> But there is one current Broadway hit he'd like to see: "The Drowsy  
> Chaperone," an old-fashioned comedy about a die-hard musical fan and his record  
> collection. 
> That one, Hummel said, sounds right up his  alley.
>
>
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