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I used to do the remote end of two-ways for the CBC, BBC and NPR. 
This was before the Internets, so I would typically send the tape to 
the producer via overnight express. For NPR feeds, I would send the 
audio through a satellite uplink.

I think the usual approach would be to copy each end of the 
conversation on a separate track of the two-channel production tape, 
so overlapping speech would not be a problem in small doses.

John Ross

At  2/22/2007 08:49 PM, you wrote:
>Steven C. Barr(x) wrote:
>>----- Original Message ----- From: "David Lennick" <[log in to unmask]>
>>>That's called a double ender. We used to do them all the time at the CBC.
>>>
>>>Cutting and splicing works only when each participant speaks and 
>>>then stops. Pretty hard to mix when you have an animated give and 
>>>take conversation, but probably not as difficult to do it electronically..
>>Could you not record the entirety of what occured (sonically) at both
>>ends, and then create an "interview tape" by editing both results...?
>>Steven C. Barr
>>
>In the good old days, we'd do that by having both tapes physically 
>in one studio. I can't remember whether that involved feeding one of 
>the tapes down the line or shipping it (hard to believe, but it 
>might have been necessary in some cases). Today you could probably 
>send it as a file.
>
>dl