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Also note that GE/NBC has cracked down on YouTube. Pretty soon, it will be back to being what it 
started out as -- a bunch of boring junk from kids with video cameras. The copyright owners will 
want to distribute video for pay or for free on their own websites. And YouTube's inventors will 
turn out to be the cleverist of the dot-bomb zillionaires for selling at just the right time for 
maximum hype-dollars (although that title may forever belong to Mark Cuban, who invented a now-dead 
audio site and sold it for megabux to Yahoo when they panic'd about Real Networks stealing the whole 
streaming audio show; now Cuban is a loud and obnoxious basketball team owner).

By the way, I have been impressed and pleased by the growth of video podcasts available free via 
iTunes. Most of the Sunday political talk shows are now available either as audio or either video or 
audio podcasts. I believe that eventually network TV shows will go this way -- have a podcast 
available with commercials for free during perhaps a 2-week period surrounding the original 
broadcast and then have the episode available without commercials for a couple of bucks forever 
afterward. When that happens, it'll sure put the last nail in the coffin of most VHS decks and 
probably kill off TiVo too.

-- Tom Fine

----- Original Message ----- 
From: "Marcos Sueiro" <[log in to unmask]>
To: <[log in to unmask]>
Sent: Saturday, February 03, 2007 9:12 AM
Subject: Re: [ARSCLIST] Some YouTube stuff that may be of interst


> Bert,
>
> I don't think it makes a difference. If the audio is under copyright, it is illegal to post it. I 
> believe you are also required to state the copyright owners.
>
> This is a related article from this week:
>
> Viacom wants its clips removed from YouTube
>
> Associated Press
> Published February 3, 2007
>
> NEW YORK -- Media company Viacom Inc., which owns the cable networks MTV, VH1, Nickelodeon and the 
> Paramount Pictures movie studio, asked YouTube on Friday to remove more than 100,000 unauthorized 
> clips from its hugely popular video-sharing site.
>
> Viacom said in a statement that after several months of talks with YouTube and its corporate 
> parent, the online search leader Google Inc., "it has become clear that YouTube is unwilling to 
> come to a fair market agreement that would make Viacom content available to YouTube users."
>
> Viacom said that YouTube and Google had failed to deliver on several "filtering tools" to control 
> unauthorized video from appearing on the immensely popular site.
>
> The company was now asking YouTube to take the clips down, but stopped short of filing a lawsuit.
>
> Under federal copyright law, online services such as YouTube are generally immune from liability 
> as long as it responds to takedown requests such as these, which YouTube often does. Less clear 
> legally is what happens when another user posts the same video, something commonly done on the 
> free video-sharing site.
>
> YouTube said in a statement that it would comply with the request from Viacom and said it 
> cooperates "with all copyright holders to identify and promptly remove infringing content as soon 
> as we are officially notified."
>
> The company also said it was "unfortunate that Viacom will no longer be able to benefit from 
> YouTube's passionate audience which has helped to promote many of Viacom's shows."
>
> In November, YouTube agreed to delete nearly 30,000 files after the Japan Society for Rights of 
> Authors, Composers and Publishers complained of copyright infringement.
>
> Some media companies such as CBS Corp. and General Electric Co.'s NBC Universal have made deals to 
> allow YouTube to use video clips from their programming, but others have yet to agree with the 
> site over ways of being compensated for the use of their copyrighted material.
>
> Universal Music Group, a division of French telecommunications giant Vivendi SA, had threatened to 
> sue YouTube for copyright infringement, saying it was a hub for pirated music videos, but later 
> reached a licensing deal with them last year.
>
> Despite Viacom's problems with YouTube, the company's MTV Networks division reached a licensing 
> deal last year with Google that allows the search company's video service to use clips from MTV 
> and its sibling networks under a revenue-sharing agreement.
>
>
>
>
> Bertram Lyons wrote:
>> Does the fact that this is a home video alter the issues of copyright? If he were to do the same 
>> thing (i.e. digitize his 78 collection) and publish it online as an audio database with full 
>> sound files (instead of home video), would he be under any sort of copyright violation with the 
>> particular labels and songwriters associated with said recordings?
>>
>> Just curious -
>>
>> Bertram
>>
>>
>>
>>> -------- Original Message --------
>>> Subject: [ARSCLIST] Some YouTube stuff that may be of interst
>>> From: Roger and Allison Kulp <[log in to unmask]>
>>> Date: Fri, February 02, 2007 10:06 pm
>>> To: [log in to unmask]
>>>
>>> http://www.youtube.com/profile_videos?user=78MAN&page=1
>>>
>>> I will admit the guy has a lousy player,and some of his records aren't the best shape.
>>> I have a better condition "Move It !" 78 myself,but it is interesting,
>>>                                                   Roger
>>>
>>>
>>> "If you're not on somebody's watchlist,you're not doing your job"
>>>
>>>                           Dave Von Kleist
>>>  ---------------------------------
>>> Don't get soaked.  Take a quick peak at the forecast with theYahoo! Search weather shortcut.
>>>
>