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Hi Steve:

There was a great cartoon during the World Cup, left pane was "what Americans think of European 
'football'," showing a bunch of skinny guys running with purses and fancy shoes kicking a soccer 
ball. The other pane was "what Europeans think of American 'football,'" showing something akin to a 
barbarian death-match with fists and weapons flying.

-- Tom Fine

----- Original Message ----- 
From: "Steven Smolian" <[log in to unmask]>
To: <[log in to unmask]>
Sent: Saturday, February 03, 2007 12:28 PM
Subject: Re: [ARSCLIST] Some YouTube stuff that may be of interst


> Tom, I wouldn't know about this if I weren't a fan.
>
> Most close friends know I have a "do not call" policy in place on approriate days during football 
> season.
>
> As a professional eBayer, I also know not to end auctions during significant sporting events.  I'm 
> bidding on three auctions closing tomorrow during the game.  The sellers are all Europeans.  What 
> do they know about fancy football?
>
> Steve Smolian
>
> ----- Original Message ----- 
> From: "Tom Fine" <[log in to unmask]>
> To: <[log in to unmask]>
> Sent: Saturday, February 03, 2007 11:55 AM
> Subject: Re: [ARSCLIST] Some YouTube stuff that may be of interst
>
>
>> NFL Films is a vast enterprise. Every game has been filmed/taped/recorded since the early 60's 
>> and probably before that. They have a large production staff, and probably work in conjunction 
>> with team scouting/production staff. Remember that each team also has a well-funded media 
>> department and dissecting "film" of the previous games and of the upcoming opponent are 
>> long-established parts of football. Given the NFL's reputation for well-funded, well-staffed and 
>> efficient media/marketing, they are probably on the vanguard of how to do this for maximum 
>> profitability. Also, the NFL is a showcase of a commercial organization that values and contantly 
>> profits from its history and archived media. Indeed, its marketing legitimacy (and much of its 
>> popularity in mainstream America) is based on the tradition and history. Big Music could spend 
>> years at the school of how to do it right by interning with the NFL.
>>
>> BTW, the NFL is a fascinating thing in and of itself. The league is the most socialist of sports 
>> organization, with most revenue shared between highly profitable large-market teams and 
>> not-so-profitable small-market teams, and it is the most financially successful. The lucrative TV 
>> package is what subsidizes the small-market teams and the draft rules and salary cap maintain 
>> rough parity so in most years, about half the teams stand a legitimate shot of getting to the 
>> Superbowl (in some years more, in some years fewer). This guarantees a wide-spread and mainstream 
>> audience --  indeed the only place where NFL teams seem to have trouble thriving is Los Angeles, 
>> which is hardly mainstream anymore. There is a tradition of multi-generation family ownerships, 
>> although that is changing and the business is more crass and gauche because of it. I think 
>> they've overplayed their marketing hand in recent years, and run the risk of infuriating people 
>> the way Disney does, although studies show that young people don't even notice invasive and 
>> annoying over-marketing the way folks in my age bracket do.
>>
>> If you can stand the hype, enjoy the Superbowl tomorrow. If the score is tied or close at 
>> half-time, I predict an exciting ending. But either team could blow it open and either team could 
>> not show up half-hearted, and then all that's left to watch are the commercials! Am I the only 
>> audio geek who is also a rabid football fan?
>>
>> -- Tom Fine
>>
>> ----- Original Message ----- 
>> From: "Steven Smolian" <[log in to unmask]>
>> To: <[log in to unmask]>
>> Sent: Saturday, February 03, 2007 11:19 AM
>> Subject: Re: [ARSCLIST] Some YouTube stuff that may be of interst
>>
>>
>>> Speaking of dealing with large quantities of old materials, did you notice the National Football 
>>> League now has each play of the season recallable on video instantlyl?  This is a cataloging 
>>> challenge of great complexity with similarities in scope to those  related to music and 
>>> recordings.  Has anyone an informed idea of how this was accomplished? Using team names and 
>>> uniform numbers, perhaps?  Is this something we can learn from?
>>>
>>> Steve Smolian
>>>
>>>
>>> ----- Original Message ----- 
>>> From: "Marcos Sueiro" <[log in to unmask]>
>>> To: <[log in to unmask]>
>>> Sent: Saturday, February 03, 2007 10:49 AM
>>> Subject: Re: [ARSCLIST] Some YouTube stuff that may be of interst
>>>
>>>
>>>> That seems to be the business model of many newspaper and periodical web sites: current items 
>>>> for free, but pay (or at least register) for the archive. If this spreads to media-posting web 
>>>> sites, as Tom suggests, it means that it will be the archive (back catalogue, legacy) materials 
>>>> that will be generating the revenue: exactly the opposite of what the current model is for the 
>>>> entertainment industry. I daresay that librarians, archivists, and even collectors, with their 
>>>> experience in dealing with large quantities of old materials, could then be very valuable 
>>>> people for such companies. Not to mention the libraries, archives, and private collections 
>>>> themselves.
>>>>
>>>> Marcos
>>>>
>>>> Tom Fine wrote:
>>>>> Also note that GE/NBC has cracked down on YouTube. Pretty soon, it will be back to being what 
>>>>> it started out as -- a bunch of boring junk from kids with video cameras. The copyright owners 
>>>>> will want to distribute video for pay or for free on their own websites. And YouTube's 
>>>>> inventors will turn out to be the cleverist of the dot-bomb zillionaires for selling at just 
>>>>> the right time for maximum hype-dollars (although that title may forever belong to Mark Cuban, 
>>>>> who invented a now-dead audio site and sold it for megabux to Yahoo when they panic'd about 
>>>>> Real Networks stealing the whole streaming audio show; now Cuban is a loud and obnoxious 
>>>>> basketball team owner).
>>>>>
>>>>> By the way, I have been impressed and pleased by the growth of video podcasts available free 
>>>>> via iTunes. Most of the Sunday political talk shows are now available either as audio or 
>>>>> either video or audio podcasts. I believe that eventually network TV shows will go this way --  
>>>>> have a podcast available with commercials for free during perhaps a 2-week period surrounding 
>>>>> the original broadcast and then have the episode available without commercials for a couple of 
>>>>> bucks forever afterward. When that happens, it'll sure put the last nail in the coffin of most 
>>>>> VHS decks and probably kill off TiVo too.
>>>>>
>>>>> -- Tom Fine
>>>>>
>>>>> ----- Original Message ----- From: "Marcos Sueiro" <[log in to unmask]>
>>>>> To: <[log in to unmask]>
>>>>> Sent: Saturday, February 03, 2007 9:12 AM
>>>>> Subject: Re: [ARSCLIST] Some YouTube stuff that may be of interst
>>>>>
>>>>>
>>>>>> Bert,
>>>>>>
>>>>>> I don't think it makes a difference. If the audio is under copyright, it is illegal to post 
>>>>>> it. I believe you are also required to state the copyright owners.
>>>>>>
>>>>>> This is a related article from this week:
>>>>>>
>>>>>> Viacom wants its clips removed from YouTube
>>>>>>
>>>>>> Associated Press
>>>>>> Published February 3, 2007
>>>>>>
>>>>>> NEW YORK -- Media company Viacom Inc., which owns the cable networks MTV, VH1, Nickelodeon 
>>>>>> and the Paramount Pictures movie studio, asked YouTube on Friday to remove more than 100,000 
>>>>>> unauthorized clips from its hugely popular video-sharing site.
>>>>>>
>>>>>> Viacom said in a statement that after several months of talks with YouTube and its corporate 
>>>>>> parent, the online search leader Google Inc., "it has become clear that YouTube is unwilling 
>>>>>> to come to a fair market agreement that would make Viacom content available to YouTube 
>>>>>> users."
>>>>>>
>>>>>> Viacom said that YouTube and Google had failed to deliver on several "filtering tools" to 
>>>>>> control unauthorized video from appearing on the immensely popular site.
>>>>>>
>>>>>> The company was now asking YouTube to take the clips down, but stopped short of filing a 
>>>>>> lawsuit.
>>>>>>
>>>>>> Under federal copyright law, online services such as YouTube are generally immune from 
>>>>>> liability as long as it responds to takedown requests such as these, which YouTube often 
>>>>>> does. Less clear legally is what happens when another user posts the same video, something 
>>>>>> commonly done on the free video-sharing site.
>>>>>>
>>>>>> YouTube said in a statement that it would comply with the request from Viacom and said it 
>>>>>> cooperates "with all copyright holders to identify and promptly remove infringing content as 
>>>>>> soon as we are officially notified."
>>>>>>
>>>>>> The company also said it was "unfortunate that Viacom will no longer be able to benefit from 
>>>>>> YouTube's passionate audience which has helped to promote many of Viacom's shows."
>>>>>>
>>>>>> In November, YouTube agreed to delete nearly 30,000 files after the Japan Society for Rights 
>>>>>> of Authors, Composers and Publishers complained of copyright infringement.
>>>>>>
>>>>>> Some media companies such as CBS Corp. and General Electric Co.'s NBC Universal have made 
>>>>>> deals to allow YouTube to use video clips from their programming, but others have yet to 
>>>>>> agree with the site over ways of being compensated for the use of their copyrighted material.
>>>>>>
>>>>>> Universal Music Group, a division of French telecommunications giant Vivendi SA, had 
>>>>>> threatened to sue YouTube for copyright infringement, saying it was a hub for pirated music 
>>>>>> videos, but later reached a licensing deal with them last year.
>>>>>>
>>>>>> Despite Viacom's problems with YouTube, the company's MTV Networks division reached a 
>>>>>> licensing deal last year with Google that allows the search company's video service to use 
>>>>>> clips from MTV and its sibling networks under a revenue-sharing agreement.
>>>>>>
>>>>>>
>>>>>>
>>>>>>
>>>>>> Bertram Lyons wrote:
>>>>>>> Does the fact that this is a home video alter the issues of copyright? If he were to do the 
>>>>>>> same thing (i.e. digitize his 78 collection) and publish it online as an audio database with 
>>>>>>> full sound files (instead of home video), would he be under any sort of copyright violation 
>>>>>>> with the particular labels and songwriters associated with said recordings?
>>>>>>>
>>>>>>> Just curious -
>>>>>>>
>>>>>>> Bertram
>>>>>>>
>>>>>>>
>>>>>>>
>>>>>>>> -------- Original Message --------
>>>>>>>> Subject: [ARSCLIST] Some YouTube stuff that may be of interst
>>>>>>>> From: Roger and Allison Kulp <[log in to unmask]>
>>>>>>>> Date: Fri, February 02, 2007 10:06 pm
>>>>>>>> To: [log in to unmask]
>>>>>>>>
>>>>>>>> http://www.youtube.com/profile_videos?user=78MAN&page=1
>>>>>>>>
>>>>>>>> I will admit the guy has a lousy player,and some of his records aren't the best shape.
>>>>>>>> I have a better condition "Move It !" 78 myself,but it is interesting,
>>>>>>>>                                                   Roger
>>>>>>>>
>>>>>>>>
>>>>>>>> "If you're not on somebody's watchlist,you're not doing your job"
>>>>>>>>
>>>>>>>>                           Dave Von Kleist
>>>>>>>>  ---------------------------------
>>>>>>>> Don't get soaked.  Take a quick peak at the forecast with theYahoo! Search weather 
>>>>>>>> shortcut.
>>>>>>>>
>>>>>>
>>>>
>>>>
>>>> -- 
>>>> No virus found in this incoming message.
>>>> Checked by AVG Free Edition.
>>>> Version: 7.5.432 / Virus Database: 268.17.21/665 - Release Date: 2/2/2007 11:39 PM
>>>>
>>>>
>>>
>>
>>
>> -- 
>> No virus found in this incoming message.
>> Checked by AVG Free Edition.
>> Version: 7.5.432 / Virus Database: 268.17.21/665 - Release Date: 2/2/2007 11:39 PM
>>
>