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Marcos Sueiro <[log in to unmask]> wrote:
****I think that the transition of music companies to licencers of content 
is already happening, but it is unclear how they will make a healthy 
profit if copying of content by the consumer is so easy. (Is there a 
hacker-proof DRM? Doubtful. And, how much time and money are they 
willing to spend policing content?)
   
  How those that produce information can make a healthy profit is indeed a major question in my mind. However, I believe that the new business models based upon the digital information environment reduce the steps and the costs required to get information to the consumer. 
   
  I do wonder if this savings will be enough to stimulate the production of information, yet I think of all of the free stuff people keep adding to the web. 
   
  As we know, nothing is ever likely to be hacker-proof. 

****But a key point is this: current copyright restrictions do not allow 
other sources (collectors and libraries) to make that content available 
(free or not) for society at large. This I find pernicious.
   
  I agree. I find it curious that we have laws protecting the public's right to access basics like water...you can't dam up a stream without some sort of permit...so why can you stop a stream of information. It seems to me that the digital information environment affords us the opportunity to enforce a notion of use it (make it available) or lose it.
   
  
****The way I see it, copyright law was designed to protect a large business model that just does not work any longer. It made sense when a large investment was needed to create a product that could in turn generate large revenue. Once record companies are gone, copyright restrictions will go away.
   
  I wonder about that. Could you explain a bit more of your last sentence.

****I see the future music business as far more performance-oriented, with the recording side as almost a promotional afterthought. It is still 
easy to charge a cover to see a performance.
   
  In many ways that is already happening. Several orchestras have approached me with projects that I have refused, even when they have been willing to foot the bill. They were looking to get some publicity for their orchestra, and saw the recording as an opportunity to increase their prestige and in some ways, self esteem. I also believe the recording process helps any musician refine their art. 
   
  For me, it seems to like information creators and libraries are trying to sculpt with water...they still want to freeze it and it keeps melting.
   
  Karl