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...it positively saps the battery as well.

-----Original Message-----
From: Association for Recorded Sound Discussion List
[mailto:[log in to unmask]] On Behalf Of Scott Phillips
Sent: Monday, April 23, 2007 1:40 PM
To: [log in to unmask]
Subject: Re: [ARSCLIST] MP3 player for public

My Ipod 30gb unit has no trouble with 44.1/16 wav files at all, although
at times it becomes clear that because of the file size it strains the
disk access time if you rapidly step between songs manually. Mp3 files
at any sample rate I've tried are also handled seamlessly. Now, I happen
to hate itunes as clunky and blotted.... But then that is just my
personal opinion.

-----Original Message-----
From: Association for Recorded Sound Discussion List
[mailto:[log in to unmask]] On Behalf Of Steven C. Barr(x)
Sent: Sunday, April 22, 2007 6:22 PM
To: [log in to unmask]
Subject: Re: [ARSCLIST] MP3 player for public

----- Original Message -----
From: "Tom Fine" <[log in to unmask]>
> Well, there is a reason the iPod is far and away the best selling
> digital
music player -- ease of
> use and user-friendly interface. You'd be hard pressed to find a
> better
interface, although someone
> probably makes a specialized player of some sort for institutional
purposes.
I've seen specialized
> CD players in museums -- the covers are locked and they are ruggedized

> and
offer only play and stop
> buttons, covered in rubber so slimy little fingers can't break them.
> Someone
must make a similar MP3
> player.
>
> Another idea -- seek out an Apple refurb or recycling place in Europe.

> You
might find a load of iPod
> Mini or even an early Nano for very cheap. A Nano might be your ideal
> choice
because it's got
> solid-state memory, not a hard drive, and will thus last longer under
> constant
jarring.
>
The problem with genuine Apple iPods is that they use a proprietary
sound-file format. I don't kmow if they can convert other more common
formats (i.e.
CD, .wav, .mp3, usw.)...but I do know that material intended for the
iPod can't be played by anything else (there may be Apple-built
exceptions...?)

One can also buy "MP3 players," which act much the same as iPods but use
more accessible file format...

Steven C. Barr