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----- Original Message ----- 
From: "Rod Stephens" <[log in to unmask]>
> Bob Olhsson wrote:
> >-----Original Message-----
> >>From Rod Stephens: "...I vaguely remember in "the good 'ole days", 
> >making copies and sharing music with my reel to reel machines and later 
> >with my cassette recorders.  We then would buy the original LPs/45s of 
> >the best of the best with good album notes and pictures.   Somehow the 
> >recording industry seemed to prosper in those less restrictive and 
> >creative days."
> >This is comparing apples to oranges. People needed to meet up, make their
> >copies in real time, pay good money for blank media and a copy of the copy
> >was pretty raunchy sounding.
> I object.  My reel to reel machines were always "Hi-Fi" as were my 
> cassette decks.
> 
> > We also didn't have investment bankers creating
> >new corporations having a "business model" of profiteering from facilitating
> >copyright infringement.
> >
> >Piracy is far from the only or even the biggest problem professional music
> >faces today but make no mistake about the fact that it has cost at least a
> >generation of youngsters any opportunity to have a career creating and
> >performing music. They and the music fans are the real losers.
> >  
> >
> Nobody was talking about "piracy" back then.   Copying was the privilege 
> of owning the original recording.  But, yes, it took more time and 
> energy and love of sharing good music to do it.
> 
But what CAN be done today...and what couldn't be done (except possible
in a very few cases) is that one can create what is sonically and digitally
an EXACT copy of a sound recording!

In every analog format, duplication involved loss of content as well as
addition of spurious content. The only exception could have been the
vinyl repressings taken not-quite-licitly from original "metal parts"...?

Steven C. Barr