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Maybe there is a simpler explanation.  Gain riding on the tape.

SA

----- Original Message ----- 
From: "George Brock-Nannestad" <[log in to unmask]>
To: <[log in to unmask]>
Sent: Wednesday, May 30, 2007 5:17 AM
Subject: Re: [ARSCLIST] Cedar - acoustical recordings


> From: Patent Tactics, George Brock-Nannestad
>
> Joe Salerno said:
>
>> Interesting.
>>
>> The reason I ask is that I have a tape of an
>> acoustical Columbia side by Josef Hofmann. The piano
>> sounds quite distant from the horn at the beginning
>> but by the end of the side the sound is much closer.
>> The pianist plays continuously.
>>
>> I have wondered how this came to be.
>>
> ------ that sounds interesting, and the explanation logical. Columbia made
> some quite good "distant" recordings. But if moving the piano (or the
> recording machine for that matter was used - I have never seen it.
>
> Kind regards,
>
> George
>
>
>>
>> George Brock-Nannestad wrote:
>> > From: Patent Tactics, George Brock-Nannestad
>> >
>> > Hello,
>> >
>> > Joe Salerno asked:
>> >
>> >> Is there any reference to the piano being placed on
>> >> a system of rails or some such to move it closer to
>> >> or farther from the horn?
>> >>
>> >
>> > ----- I have not seen any reference to this. But I have seen a letter
>> > describing that the Gramophone Company for some records (and I suspect
>> only
>> > for a period, which IIRC would have been before 1910) used two pianos 
>> > for
>> > accompaniment. I have no information whether they played in unison or
>> four-
>> > hand. I suspect unison.
>> >
>> > Kind regards,
>> >
>> >
>> > George
>> >
>> >> Don Cox wrote:
>> >>> On 28/05/07, George Brock-Nannestad wrote:
>> >>>
>> >>>> From: Patent Tactics, George Brock-Nannestad
>> >>>>
>> >>>> Don Cox asked:
>> >>>>
>> >>>>
>> >>>>> On 27/05/07, George Brock-Nannestad wrote:
>> >>>>>
>> >>>>>
>> >>>>>> I would guess that in most cases, if not all, the original room 
>> >>>>>> was
>> >>>>>> not designed at all, apart from such things as putting the piano 
>> >>>>>> up
>> >>>>>> on a platform.
>> >>>>> The Gramophone Company
>> >>>>> in their recording rooms in Hayes (post 1912) had ceilings that
>> >>>>> could be raised or lowered by rack and pinion according to the 
>> >>>>> task.
>> >>>>>
>> >>>>> Interesting. Do you have a reference for that?
>> >>>> ----- I have seen it with my own eyes, both from below and from the
>> >>>> loft. It would have been in the early 1980s, when I spent quite some
>> >>>> time in the archives, before their move. The "studio" had been
>> >>>> restored some time prior to that, and in itself it was a hard room,
>> >>>> with pine panelling. I would be surprised if there were no
>> >>>> contemporary reports of the restoration.
>> >>> Your eyes are good enough for me.
>> >>>>>> ----- Edison also performed experiments with performers placed on
>> >>>>>> squares drawn on the floor (Harvith & Harvith).
>> >>>>>>
>> >>>>> Distance from the horn is obviously critical, but that isn't the
>> same
>> >>>>> as the design of the studio. Nowadays, everyone is aware of things
>> >>>>> like live and dead ends, etc.
>> >>>> ----- now, we cannot draw a direct line from amateur recording on
>> >>>> cylinder machines to record companies, but in the manuals for
>> amateurs
>> >>>> they already then described how to use screens and cubicles for some
>> >>>> instruments.
>> >>>>
>> >>> Regards
>> >
>> > __________ NOD32 2296 (20070529) Information __________
>> >
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>> > http://www.eset.com
>> >
>> >
>> >