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One more example of how time can injur a recording.

"William Faulkner Reads" on Caedmon, recorded 1954. By the time HarperCollins re-issued it, first on 
cassette and later as a multi-CD set, the master tape had become badly damaged, probably due to 
storage tail out in a loose winding. The end section is full of dropouts. It sounds like the 
engineer made the mistake of transferring a full-track tape with a 2-track head and not even summing 
to mono. And he wasn't skilled enough to use a cotton swab or gauze to hold the warped tape against 
the head to prevent the dropouts. Also went nuts with Sonic Solutions NoNoise and killed all the 
room echo and ambience.

-- Tom Fine

----- Original Message ----- 
From: "David Lennick" <[log in to unmask]>
To: <[log in to unmask]>
Sent: Tuesday, May 08, 2007 6:52 PM
Subject: Re: [ARSCLIST] SACD fans -- some discounts


> Even before that..I bought new pressings of all the Lenny Bruce Fantasy LPs in the 70s and a 
> couple of them had several layers of echo and pre-echo. New transfers from bad tapes.
>
> There were some weird things in the early CD days. I remember the CBC purchasing what appeared to 
> be an authorized CD reissue of the "Zorba the Greek" soundtrack. It was dubbed from noisy vinyl 
> and all the tracks ran together.
>
> dl
>
> Tom Fine wrote:
>> This is already the case for more than a few jazz albums and spoken word recordings. The tapes 
>> were either 1.5 feet in the grave when they were transferred in the 80's or were subsequently 
>> lost.
>>
>> -- Tom Fine
>>
>> ----- Original Message ----- From: "Don Cox" <[log in to unmask]>
>> To: <[log in to unmask]>
>> Sent: Tuesday, May 08, 2007 8:23 AM
>> Subject: Re: [ARSCLIST] SACD fans -- some discounts
>>
>>
>> <snip>
>>
>>>
>>> Some important recordings may only survive as poor quality digital
>>> transfers made in the 80s or early 90s.
>>>
>>> Regards
>>> -- 
>>> Don Cox
>>> [log in to unmask]
>>>
>>
>