Print

Print


"Steven C. Barr(x)" <[log in to unmask]> wrote:    *** So, your next task will/should be the assembly
of the "Ultimate 101 Strings History/Discography" (IIRC, Lennick saidthey appear on 78's as well...?!). Now, what worries me is that there may well be Mantovani fans...and even fans of "Doggie In the Window"...out there in "Radio-Land!"
   
  A History/Discography of 101 Strings is low on my list, however, (playing the devil's advocate) they did sell a bunch of discs and it would seem that their name recognition alone would justify such a book. As for the "Doggie," I wonder, is there a history of novelty songs...I would love to read it. There certainly are CD compilations of them.
   
  Again, I wonder, what is worth saving? I wish I knew. Years ago we were offered a collection of educational records, everything from discs to accompany film strips to those wonderful YPR (Young People's Records) discs. Of course I added them to the collection and...soon to be published is a book on YPR written by a guy here in Austin...and I we are still negotiating to get the rights to rerelease some of them...try dealing with an estate of three sisters...two of them are not on speaking terms... Some of my colleagues thought such materials were not worth keeping. I should also add that we had a dissertation done on the history of music appreciation, (music memory, etc.) 
   
  ***However, too many libraries consider their obligation to be that of supplying their "public" with the best-sellers, a number of popular magazines, and the standard reference works.
   
  Ah yes, what I like to call the "Barnes and Noble Syndrome."
   
  ***As far as the latter is concerned, it is people like him (and to some extent myself...) who are considered at best "eccentric" (there are other less innocent descriptions, of course...) who eventually wind up collecting and preserving our heritage!
   
  I am reminded of a friend of mine who collects art. There was a painter whose works my friend liked. When the artist died the family planned to toss most of what he had done. My friend bought it all. There have now been two major exhibits of that artist's works and my friend's art collection would bring a hefty sum at auction.

***Of course, in considerations of "what ought to be preserved," I tend to be on one extreme...meaning that were I in charge of archival decisions my position would be "Save it all...SOMEDAY someone might need it!"

  Fine, but where are you going to put it all? 
   
  Karl