Print

Print


----- Original Message ----- 
From: "Roger and Allison Kulp" <[log in to unmask]>
> If you truly believe this,you are truly living in the past.As with the old
news media model,the old music distribution/royalty/radio airplay model is no
more.The wise artists know this,and are undercutting the labels.Anybody can
upload music to YouTube or My Space,and potentially have 100,000s of people hear
it in the first week alone.If you don't want to upload a whole song or
piece,just do like Amazon,and go the snippet/sample route.Sell downloads.Press
up limited private issue CDs and vinyl,and sell them exclusively on your
site.Sooner or later the labels will realize they can no longer have new music
to sell,and will have to hammer out deals with online retailers to sell their
back catalogue stuff.Even if its only downloads.The sooner they realize the
glory years of the 70s and 80s are never coming back,the better.
>
> The RIAA is dying a slow,painful death,and it is a joy to watch.
>
> Granted this about new music,but there may be ways around this for webcasting.
>
>  Live365 for example,has what they call a VIP membership,that includes each
members blanket royalty payment.The cost is minimal,as it's spread out over many
members.I don't see what the problem is.Why is this so difficult ? Could
somebody enlighten me ?
>
First, if one elects to use YouTube, MySpace, or (for the most part) other
similar web-based services...one problem is that you are one of millions
(give or take) who choose to distribute music...as well as non-musical
creations or copies material this way! Back in the days of recordings
being played on radio, either the station had a fairly short playlist...or,
if your material was part of a specific genre, the radio programs who
played your "magnum opus" were also genre-specific!

Keep in mind that you...the artist-wannabee...are presumably totally
unknown, at least in the beginning...so it's your assigned task to
make that half-vast mass of web surfers aware of your existence...!

As far as your second question, in most cases webcasting royalties are
based on the number of web users who access your "broadcast"...so, as
your audience increases, so does your "royalty bill!"

Steven C. Barr