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The best promo copies of all were Capitol's black label vinyl 78s in the late 
40s. Unbelievably quiet. I gladly take radio station collections because I 
stand a good chance of finding lots of those (Victors were also very good and 
were often a different cut from the commercial pressings, and Columbia's vinyls 
were.. better than nothing). Majestic also did vinyls which are fabulous, but 
they didn't stick around long enough to do too many of them. And I think I've 
seen one vinyl Musicraft in my entire life (a red vinyl, part of one of the 
Andres Segovia sets). Any DJ pressings I've seen of Musicraft have different 
labels but are still on the same asphalt & camel turd mix they used commercially.

dl

Roger and Allison Kulp wrote:
> Not just test pressings.It's also the promo copies that were pressed for radio,especially in the 70s.
> 
> 
> 
>                             Roger
> 
> Tom Fine <[log in to unmask]> wrote: Why do most test pressings that I've heard sound better than a bought-in-store version of the LP? 
> Did the plants do something special for the test pressing or use a "brewer's choice" biscuit 
> compound or is it more a random chance of having a further-down-the-production-run copy in a store 
> and thus worn stampers? Where I've been able to compare a master laquer to a test pressing to a 
> bought-in-store version of the same cut/matrix/whatever, the test pressing usually sounds pretty 
> darn close to the first cut but the production disk sounds inferior, usually lower s/n ratio and 
> noisier surface. This was less true in the one case I've been able to compare all 3 for a modern LP 
> reissue and I assume it's because a modern reissue that appears at retail will be pressed with more 
> care on better vinyl and fewer copies will be made per stamper, but I might be wrong on that.
> 
> In some older examples, late 50's and early 60's, the retail version vinyl seems to definitely be a 
> different compound from the test pressing, which more resembles modern, "softer" quieter-playing 
> compounds.
> 
> -- Tom Fine
> 
> 
>        
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