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We once had a posting to this list by someone who was involved with the 
manufaturing and/or maintainence of stand alone hard drives.  His concern 
was that the lubrcants would harden or otherwise change and could not be 
restored.

Steve Smolian



----- Original Message ----- 
From: "Don Cox" <[log in to unmask]>
To: <[log in to unmask]>
Sent: Thursday, July 19, 2007 4:36 AM
Subject: Re: [ARSCLIST] "hard drive on a shelf"


> On 17/07/07, Jeffrey Kane wrote:
>
>> Humidity is the enemy more than temperature. Corresponding anti-static
>> measures are vital. A 'dry cabinet' will be essential. Also, contrary
>> to film and tape storage, you want the temperature to be warmer.
>> Thanks to RoHS, tin pest is a distant but real concern especially
>> given that you intend to shelf store the drives. Below 13c/55F, tin
>> changes structure. This change can cause solder joints to fail.
>>
>> I am, of course, sidestepping discussion of why using HDDs for
>> archival storage is a bad idea.
>>
> I think the most likely thing to fail on a hard drive long term is
> capacitors on the circuit board.
>
> But more likely is that, when the drive is brought out of its cupboard
> 25 years later, there will be no equipment to connect it to and no
> operating system that can read the file format. Try getting data off a
> 25 year old cp/m drive today.
>
> Regards
> -- 
> Don Cox
> [log in to unmask]
>
>
> -- 
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