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Well, in that era, everyone grew out their hair, literally and figuratively. If I'm manager of a 
cutting place or a cutting department at a major label, at that time, I don't care if a guy writes 
his kids' names in perfect penmanship as long as he shows up semi-sober and does a good job.

-- Tom Fine

----- Original Message ----- 
From: "Frank Wylie" <[log in to unmask]>
To: <[log in to unmask]>
Sent: Tuesday, July 03, 2007 8:46 PM
Subject: Re: [ARSCLIST] LP pressing question


> Well, from what I remember, and for what it is worth, these were actual phrases like, "Keep on 
> Truckin" and "Still Spinning" in a very fluid, almost perfect, penmanship.
> Would have been pretty mainstream stuff in the late 70's and early 80's;  Bad Co, Hendrix, Foghat, 
> Eagles, The Fixx, etc...  Sorry, don' t remember the record labels off hand.
>
> Frank
>
> Tom Fine wrote:
>> I think all sorts of strange stuff took place with cutting guys in the 60's, 70's and at th end 
>> of the LP era.  Stan Ricker had some quite original stuff in his Mobile Fidelity cuts of the 
>> 70's. In earlier times, too much fanciful stuff was frowned on but every cutter had his "maker's 
>> mark" that he would inscribe. At Fine Sound in the 50's, most cuts would just have the catalog 
>> number stamped in the dead wax like early Mercury MG series. Same for Verve, Kapp and Grand Award 
>> cut there. This might have been a practice my father picked up at Reeves in the late 40's or 
>> Majestic before that. When Fine Recording opened up, George Piros was dealing with more lathes 
>> and more cutter heads --  certain combinations preferred by certain producers -- so he started a 
>> code of "PXX" with XX being a number representing a lathe and cutter head. He would hand-scribe 
>> his mark plus the catalog number and side a or b into the dead wax. John Johnson would scribe JJ. 
>> Once dedicated mastering houses sprung up, you'd see a stamp imprint of, for instance, "Mastered 
>> by MasterDisc". I'm not sure if guys at the pressing plant would further scribe the dead wax to 
>> indicate a replacement part or later replacement master. I would imagine a major label's 
>> mastering department, like Columbia, would some pretty complex codes to follow in the interest of 
>> uniformity.
>>
>> Bob, how many cutters were there at Motown and what was your system?
>>
>> -- Tom Fine
>>
>>
>> ----- Original Message ----- From: "Frank Wylie" <[log in to unmask]>
>> To: <[log in to unmask]>
>> Sent: Tuesday, July 03, 2007 6:53 PM
>> Subject: Re: [ARSCLIST] LP pressing question
>>
>>
>>> Roger and Allison Kulp wrote:
>>>> Bob,
>>>>
>>>> Dead wax is the term for the area in between the label.and the end of the runoff 
>>>> groove.Actually non-promo test pressings get out there quite a bit.I own several dozen.At least 
>>>> 100 or so,including one of "A Christmas Gift to You From Philles Records".The oldest one I have 
>>>> seen,is an early Columbia test pressing of an uncredited recording of "Casey Jones",that I was 
>>>> able to date to about 1906.I sold it on eBay last year.This had a blank white label,with the 
>>>> title written in pencil,and the label usually found on the backs of Columbia of this period.
>>>>
>>>>
>>>>                                     Roger
>>>>
>>>>
>>> Apropos of nothing;  I remember as a teen discovering cryptic messages inscribed in the "dead 
>>> wax" (thanks for a new term!) area of LPs I purchased.  They  must have been cut into the 
>>> masters and most messages were in the (for lack of a better term) retrace area that parks the 
>>> needle at the end of the record.
>>>
>>> Can't even remember which albums had these strange tags on the retrace; anyone else know of this 
>>> practice and any history behind it?
>>>
>>> Thanks.
>>> -- 
>>>
>>> S. Frank Wylie
>>> Independent Motion Picture Specialist
>>> Dayton, Ohio
>>>
>>
>
>
> -- 
> S. Frank Wylie
> Independent Motion Picture Specialist
> Dayton, Ohio
>