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In sending this out (below) last night, I transposed the identification 
of the "Italian" to Herr Beethoven when it was really for Signori Resphigi.

Rod

Rod Stephens wrote:

> Hello Rod,
>
> This reply is from another Rod (myself), and the one recording I 
> bought when Hi-Fi hit our country  was the Westminster demo record (it 
> was mono, since this preceded stereo), "WESTMINSTER'S HI-FI 
> DEMONSTRATION RECORD" #DRB.  From the cover, "A PRESENTATION OF MUSIC 
> FROM OUTSTANDING WESTMINSTER RECORDINGS SELECTED FOR DEMONSTRATION 
> PURPOSES OF FINE, WIDE-RANGE PHONOGRAPH EQUIPMENT
>
> *  The Contents
>
> FREQUENCY TONES IN ALL AUDIBLE RANGES FROM 40 TO 15,000 CPS.
>
> MUSIC WITH CONTROLLABLE RANGE FROM 30 TO 15,000 CPS.
>
> DEFINITION IN LOUD PASSAGES WITHOUT INTERMODULATION
>
> SEPARATE BANDS OF SOUND OF PERCUSSION, STRING, WOODWIND
> AND BRASS GROUPS, PIANO, HARPSICHORD AND GUITAR
>
> STROBOSCOPE FOR CONTROL OF TURNTABLE 
> SPEED                                            (The logo of 
> the                          
>                                                                                                                                   
>       Westminster clock tower)
> with the inscription, "Natural Balance   Westminster Long Playing 
> Records"
>
> It exposed me to classical music that I hadn't ever really listened to 
> before, but as a result, became a fan of such as those "far out" 
> Russians like Gliere and Rachmaninoff and that crazy Italian, 
> Beethoven and his later friend, Respighi.
>
> Ah, the joys of discovery when you're a young person (not to mention, 
> Britten's "Y.P.'s Guide to the Orchestra").
>
> Rod Stephens
>
> David Lennick wrote:
>
>> Steven C. Barr(x) wrote:
>>
>>> ----- Original Message ----- From: "rodbrown" <[log in to unmask]>
>>>
>>>> Hi all,
>>>>
>>>> I'm timidly un-lurking for a moment because I have a question for 
>>>> which I'm sure the ARSClist subscribership would have a broad range 
>>>> of useful, informed opinions.
>>>>
>>>> I've recently become reacquainted with an LP I really enjoyed as a 
>>>> kid: "An Adventure In High Fidelity", subtitled "A 'New 
>>>> Orthophonic' High Fidelity Recording." This is an RCA Victor boxed 
>>>> set, LM-1802. I find I still enjoy hearing this old record.
>>>>
>>>> It purports to present great-sounding (monaural) classical and 
>>>> semi-classical music, but also offers some very entertaining pop 
>>>> instrumentals. It's an interesting listen, full of ear-catching, 
>>>> exotic sounds, highs and lows, softs and louds. It tries to be all 
>>>> things to a broad range of listeners, and doesn't fail too badly, 
>>>> seems to me.
>>>>
>>>> I'm sure there must be any number of similar efforts committed to 
>>>> vinyl by various companies who sought to interest the public in a 
>>>> particular label, or a brand of equipment, or a supposed technical 
>>>> breakthrough. Was this record a better-than-average example of a 
>>>> genre? Would any of you care to mention any fond recollections on 
>>>> this type of recording? Any recommendations?
>>>>
>>> Well, I can only comment on/in my own area of expertise...that being
>>> "one level earlier" in technical terms (shellac 78rpm discs...!).
>>> And there WERE a number of "demonstration records" issued from the
>>> beginning of that format onward. I have heard, and seen, "demonstration
>>> records" made by Berliner c.1900, to be played for potential machine
>>> buyers (don't own copies, though...!). Columbia issued at least three
>>> different such discs (with a fourth version for Canada 
>>> only...!)...Victor
>>> issued several different records in their D- series...I have similar 
>>> discs
>>> on the Perfect, Bell and Gennett labels...and Philco issued two 
>>> c.1930 discs intended to sell their radio-phonograph sets, along 
>>> with a set of
>>> several c.1940 "demo discs" of the same sort, which feature Columbia
>>> artists and are on the Columbia label. I also own a Hit-Of-The-Week 
>>> disc
>>> featuring a "Medley Of Canadian Songs," which may have been used for
>>> promotion here in Canada (and bears a rubber-stamped "Sample" legend
>>> as well). And...Victor DID issue a "promo record" for their first 
>>> 33-1/3
>>> "Program Transcription" line...with a "DL-" number.
>>>
>>> Steven C. Barr
>>>
>> In the LP era, there were all sorts of demos and promos.."Adventure 
>> in High Fidelity" is sure a better sample than "Hearing is Believing" 
>> (music samples on side 2 are fine, but the comparisons on side 1 
>> include modern versions vs acousticals!). In the early stereo days, 
>> RCA put out "Bob And Ray Throw a Stereo Spectacular" and "Sounds in 
>> Space"..the latter has crossed my hands 3 times, never in playable 
>> condition (the last copy had the Glenn Gould "So You Want To Write a 
>> Fugue" flexi scotch taped to it!).
>>
>> dl
>>
>