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> -----Original Message-----
> From: Association for Recorded Sound Discussion List
> [mailto:[log in to unmask]] On Behalf Of Don Cox
> Sent: Saturday, January 26, 2008 8:29 AM
> To: [log in to unmask]
> Subject: Re: [ARSCLIST] A proposed A/B test (was "dumbing down" of
> Downloaded Recordings)
> 
> On 26/01/08, Jon Noring wrote:
> 
> >> CJ If I may say, "the literature" is full of that stuff, wherein no
> >> group (as a group) has been found to detect any differences. Hence,
> >> CD, MP3, etc. etc.
> >
> > Of course!
> >
> > But it's amazing how many people don't believe this. Thus the
> > experiment to begin to refute a lot of misconceptions concerning
> > digital audio in the archival and reissue communities.
> >
> You could test a group to show that nobody can identify correctly the
> notes in a chord. Yet a small minority does have absolute pitch, and it
> seems
> that others can be trained to have it.
> 
> I think with experience, we are learning to spot the faults in digital
> recordings, which are not audible at first.
> 
> 
> Regards
> --
> Don Cox
> [log in to unmask]

I do not dispute the fact that some can hear things that others do not. But
how much of this relates to the audio mikeing, mixing, amplification,
equalization, etc. process and how much to the digital part? Have those who
discern faults in digital recordings conducted blind comparisons of audio
and digital playbacks that originated from the same master?

Jerry Hartke
Media Sciences, Inc.