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I've seen a couple of Russian paper records (plastic coated). Very thin. And 
some of Victor's Picture Records in the early 30s were cardboard base. Hit Of 
The Week of course is the major label producing a disc with a thin plastic 
coating over stiff paper, and they were around for a few years in the early 30s 
(producing promos even after they were no longer manufacturing commercial discs 
for the mass market).

dl

[log in to unmask] wrote:
 > Hi Dan
 >
 > The only cardboard records I am aware of were consumer grade home 
recordings, except for a few 16" transcriptions which I used to own and had 
forgotten about until that same subject was mentioned just a little while ago, 
was it on this list or 78-L?
 >
 > During the war when shellac was scarce, Columbia used cardboard as a 
substrate for laminated 78 rpm records, but I'm not sure if that falls within 
the parameters of your assignment.
 >
 > I don't think I have ever seen a paper record. Perhaps you will share some 
of your findings here when you finish the job.
 >
 > joe salerno
 >
 > Daniel Shiman wrote:
 >> Hello --  I'm Dan, longtime lurker, first-semester student at UT Austin's 
School of Information and dyed-in-the-wool vinyl junkie.  Very exciting to be 
taking a class on audio preservation this spring, but I am struggling more than 
expected with the first assignment, which involves a brief history of an early 
audio format.
 >> I chose paper/cardboard records for my topic.  Historical surveys of 
recorded media I've browsed have made little mention of this 
ephemeral-in-every-sense-of-the-word format.  Online sources like RILM 
Abstracts of Music Literature, The Music Index Online, Library Literature & 
Information Science, and Academic Search Complete have either been fruitless or 
have basically directed me to articles directing me in turn to the only website 
with much substantive information on the subject, the excellent Internet Museum 
of Flexi/Cardboard/Oddity Records (assembled by Mac, host of the WFMU's Antique 
Phonograph Music Program).
 >> I've contacted Mac pressing him for sources, but was wondering in the 
meantime if any ARSClist members knew anything about the paper/cardboard 
record's history - or knew of any good articles or written/research sources 
that I might explore.  Thanks so much!
 >> best,Dan Shiman
 >
 >