Print

Print


I notice re-pressings of earlier London LPs with RIAA CURVE added to the back 
cover from about 1957 on. The matrix numbers have an -R suffix. (On the other 
hand, this copy here of LL 1232, Bloch's Voice in the Wilderness, has the -R 
suffixes but doesn't have RIAA on the jacket. So much for consistency.)

dl

Bob Olhsson wrote:
> -----Original Message-----
>>From Richard L. Hess: "...The original question was for RIAA but there are
> few RIAA discs that 
> we should be transferring, even in Canada, as the true RIAA standard 
> came into effect what, 55 years ago?  I don't think it was adopted 
> immediately, was it? I recall seeing London/Decca FFRR recordings 
> (but maybe they were done with the RIAA curve and they just used the 
> acronym for marketing) into the 1960s and perhaps the 1970s.
> 
> 
> The RIAA is the trade group consisting of most record labels including all
> of the majors. Everybody agreed to adopt RCA's New Orthophonic curve as the
> RIAA curve. As far as I know it was quickly adopted because the need for
> different curves had become a serious problem for all labels. Virtually all
> mastering facilities calibrated their playback and cutting systems using the
> RCA New Orthophonic test disks. RCA also created the NAB disk but I never
> saw it used nearly as much as the original RCAs. Ideally one would calibrate
> a transfer channel using an RCA disk.
> 
> Bob Olhsson Audio Mastery, Nashville TN
> Mastering, Audio for Picture, Mix Evaluation and Quality Control
> Over 40 years making people sound better than they ever imagined!
> 615.385.8051 http://www.hyperback.com    http://www.thewombforums.com
> 
>