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 Steven Smolian wrote:



> The reason the shellac was worse in the early 1940s was Indonesia, where
> the shellac beatle abides, was occupied by the Japanese who were not the
> best of sharers.


Funny guy! But that raises another interesting question. Japanese pressings
from the Thirties (don't know about later) can be pretty darn good. I mean,
quiet. Were they perhaps already exercising their, ah, rights within the
Coprosperity Sphere?

clark

>
>
> Steve Smolian
>
> ----- Original Message ----- From: "David Lennick" <[log in to unmask]>
>
> To: <[log in to unmask]>
> Sent: Thursday, August 07, 2008 5:55 PM
> Subject: Re: [ARSCLIST] Listing of RCA Victor Z-scrolls?
>
>
>
> I don't know if there was a specific list, but it's my understanding that
>> theze "z" pressings were made as a requirement of the Carnegie Libraries.
>> Other companies were required to upgrade their pressing quality as well,
>> even Brunswick. I believe Victor continued to use the same high-grade
>> shellac for all Red Seal pressings after the Scroll era and until 1940 when
>> the prices were cut in half, drop automatic became standard and the industry
>> went to hell.
>>
>> dl
>>
>> Clark Johnsen wrote:
>>
>>> As many of us know, these were the finest editions from the Victor
>>> catalog
>>> ever offered, made exclusively (I'm told) for libraries and radio
>>> stations.
>>> The quality of the shellac compound even makes these spinners
>>> *look*shinier, almost immediately detectable at a glance.
>>>
>>> Does anyone know about a listing of which titles/numbers were made
>>> available
>>> in Z-scroll? Even better would be a note of how many were issued of each!
>>>
>>> Finally it's my understanding that after the scroll-label-era no such
>>> special editions were offered, although I'd like to find myself
>>> contradicted.
>>>
>>> clark
>>>
>>>