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Yeah, but, a market economy is a market economy and what won't sell won't have any commercial value. 
That's just how it is. My view on commercial broadcasting is somewhat different. It's a supply and 
demand problem, with an oversupply of the same old crap. The big broadcast chains know this, in fact 
they are mostly not in good financial shape and their shareholders are demanding change. The problem 
they might run into, the music companies have the same problem -- an oversupply of generic crap, and 
now a new supply of home-produced amateurish crap. There's demand for quality, it's just that it's a 
bunch of niches and huge mega-companies have never been good at satisfying niches.

-- Tom Fine

----- Original Message ----- 
From: "Bob Olhsson" <[log in to unmask]>
To: <[log in to unmask]>
Sent: Sunday, August 10, 2008 2:56 PM
Subject: Re: [ARSCLIST] Sony, BMG and the health of the music biz


> -----Original Message-----
> From Tom Fine: "Here is an example of one artist who gets it, understands
> where things are going:.."
>
> True however I've got a big problem with tying income for artists and
> songwriters to advertising. The advertiser ends up dictating the content of
> the music. You need look no farther than commercial broadcasting in the
> United States to see the resulting "vast wasteland" that has been created by
> putting demographic profiles ahead of basic entertainment value. Even worse,
> a sponsor's political viewpoints will often begin to dictate who gets
> exposure and who doesn't.
>
> There's an old saying, "freedom of the press only belongs to those who are
> wealthy enough to own a press." Expression that is financially beholden to
> sponsors is not free.
>
>
> Bob Olhsson Audio Mastery, Nashville TN
> Mastering, Audio for Picture, Mix Evaluation and Quality Control
> Over 40 years making people sound better than they ever imagined!
> 615.385.8051 http://www.hyperback.com    http://www.thewombforums.com
>