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I have that but it's a ten-inch.."My Old Flame". Can't remember whether it's 
Biltmore or Sentry.

dl

Robert J Hodge wrote:
>  If I recall correctly, Duke Ellington is represented on a 12 inch
> Biltmore disc in a film soundtrack transfer . With Mae West doing the
> vocal, also if memory serves. 
> 
> R. Hodge 
> 
> -----Original Message-----
> From: Association for Recorded Sound Discussion List
> [mailto:[log in to unmask]] On Behalf Of Dave Lewis
> Sent: Wednesday, September 10, 2008 1:20 PM
> To: [log in to unmask]
> Subject: Re: [ARSCLIST] Bix Beiderbecke "reissue" 78's
> 
> No argument here. I have a Biltmore of "Japanese Sandman" which I
> treasure as
> (a) the likelihood of my finding an original of that side is remote and
> (b) I
> love freaking out friends with being able to play such a weird record
> from 78;
> there's something about that you cannot get from playing a CD or LP
> reissue,
> even though the music is still weird in all formats.
> 
> 
> David "Uncle Dave" Lewis
> Assistant Editor, Classical
>  
> 
> -----Original Message-----
> From: Association for Recorded Sound Discussion List
> [mailto:[log in to unmask]] On Behalf Of Tom Fine
> Sent: Wednesday, September 10, 2008 8:50 AM
> To: [log in to unmask]
> Subject: Re: [ARSCLIST] Bix Beiderbecke "reissue" 78's
> 
> Thanks Dick. I would guess these Bix sets are dubs. Granted, we have 20
> years' march of technology progress at play here, but there is no
> comparison, sound-wise, to the restorations on the Mosaic set of Bix,
> Tram and Big Tea. Listmember Doug Pomeroy made some or all of those
> disk-to-digital transfers. The sound quality is so supreior, much more
> life-like, on the Mosaic set, that I'd say all these 78's are good for
> is Victrola fodder -- something to play on the old Victrola to show
> "them yung-uns" how their great-grandparents listened to music.
> 
> -- Tom Fine
> 
> PS -- what's the best restoration out there these days for the Bix
> Gennett horn-recorded sides?
> 
> PPS -- speaking of horns, is there modern DAW software that does what
> Soundstream did with the Caruso recordings, attempts to mitigate the
> effects of a horn-recording system?
> 
> PPPS -- I just recently read an article about the latest
> digital-re-creation of a famous piano record, the new Art Tatum at the
> Shrine album. Apparently, the group that came up with that software is
> now adapting it for other instruments and thing they are a handful of
> years away from being able re-create the human voice! I have not heard
> the Tatum album or the early Glenn Gould album, but they have both
> gotten generally good reviews. The thrust of this article was, there may
> soon come a time when many different old low-fidelity recordings can be
> re-created in a near facsimile of the original playing in a modern
> high-fidelity setting. I remain skeptical but I will also say that
> people who know piano very well have said and written very good things
> about the Gould and Tatum albums, so this group seems to have nailed how
> to channel the ghost of a long-gone piano performance. It's interesting
> to think about the implications for archives if this technology becomes
> common and low-cost. There may be times where careful restoration and
> storage is far more expensive than digital re-creation of the material
> from a worn-out source.
> 
> 
> ----- Original Message -----
> From: "Dick Spottswood" <[log in to unmask]>
> To: <[log in to unmask]>
> Sent: Wednesday, September 10, 2008 8:08 AM
> Subject: Re: [ARSCLIST] Bix Beiderbecke "reissue" 78's
> 
> 
>> Most Columbia pre-WW2 jazz reissues derive from original metal parts,
> and
>> post-war pressings are always dubs. I suspect that the post-war
> popularity
>> of record changers prompted new pressings with lead-in and "improved "
>> lead-out grooves that activated changer mechanisms more aggressively.
>> Sometimes you can spot altered lead -out grooves on pressings from
>> original metals.  The 1937 Bessie Smith memorial album and four 1933
>> Goodman titles reissued on the special BENNY GOODMAN label (3167-D,
>> 3168-D) were all dubbed.  They also marked the end of Columbia's 1-D
>> series, created in 1923.
>>
>> Victor reissued a lot of 1920s jazz on Bluebird from the mid-30s
> onward,
>> from both original and dubbed metals.  Album reissue setsof JR Morton,
>> McKinney's Cotton Pickers etc. appeared in both Canada and the US.
>> Canadian sets use original parts;  US equivalents are dubbed.
>>
>> Victor kept most of its Carter Family and Jimmie Rodgers titles
> available
>> in the Bluebird and Montgomery Ward catalogs through the 1930s,  The
> first
>> Bluebird B-5000 series reissues were dubbed, just about everything
> else
>> used original parts.
>>
>> Dick
>>
>>
>>
>>
>>
>> Steven Smolian <[log in to unmask]>
>> Sent by: Association for Recorded Sound Discussion List
> <[log in to unmask]>
>> 09/10/2008 05:42 AM
>> Please respond to
>> Association for Recorded Sound Discussion List <[log in to unmask]>
>>
>>
>> To
>> [log in to unmask]
>> cc
>>
>> Subject
>> Re: [ARSCLIST] Bix Beiderbecke "reissue" 78's
>>
>>
>>
>>
>>
>>
>> Jeff Wheeler has a book in progress on this isssue-er-reissue
> situation.
>> Steve Smolian
>>
>>
>> ----- Original Message ----- 
>> From: "David Lennick" <[log in to unmask]>
>> To: <[log in to unmask]>
>> Sent: Wednesday, September 10, 2008 12:16 AM
>> Subject: Re: [ARSCLIST] Bix Beiderbecke "reissue" 78's
>>
>>
>>> Biltmore, not Biltmor..Biltmor was a Canadian label around 1950.
> Funny
>>> about dropping the final E on common names..there was a label up here
>>> called Yorkshir as well. We drop Es and add Us.
>>>
>>> Biltmore, Temple, Sentry (and a few others) all put out dubs of rare
>> jazz
>>> 78s. Some of them weren't too atrocious. Some were..but how else were
>> you
>>> going to say you owned a copy of Zulu's Ball?
>>>
>>> dl
>>>
>>> David Lennick wrote:
>>>> Sweet Sue was a dub, and there are two versions..the complete
> original
>>>> (4:25 or so) and one with the "florid introduction" removed. We had
> the
>>>> set with the complete version but the liner notes were unchanged, so
>> for
>>>> years I wondered how much longer the original could have been! I
> didn't
>>>> find the shorter version till just a few years ago.
>>>>
>>>> And the second album is definitely all dubs, but all the Columbia
>> reissue
>>>> albums were dubs by this time, like Crosby Classics Volume II. In
> fact
>>>> Columbia was dubbing older European classical masters as well c.
> 1950.
>>>> Did Boris Rose have anything to do with Biltmor? I've seen some
>> lacquers
>>>> where the labels were the blank sides of old Biltmor labels.
>>>>
>>>> dl
>>>>
>>>> David Weiner wrote:
>>>>> Some of the Columbia reissues - especially the first album,  are
>> mostly
>>>>> master pressings. I think the later album is all dubs.
>>>>>
>>>>> The Biltmores are definitely all bootleg dubs.
>>>>>
>>>>> Dave W.
>>>>> ----------------------
>>>>>
>>>>> Hi All:
>>>>>
>>>>> I am interested in details about two Bix Beiderbecke reissue 78's.
>>>>>
>>>>> First of all, the albums put out by Columbia in the late 40's,
>> reissues
>>>>> of
>>>>> Okeh records -- were those made from old metal parts or are they
> dubs
>> of
>>>>> old records?
>>>>>
>>>>> Second, what's the story on the 78's put out on the Biltmore label?
>>>>> These
>>>>> seem to be either licensed reissues or bootlegs of old Gennett and
>>>>> Victor records, of the Wolverines
>>>>> and the Whiteman band.
>>>>>
>>>>> Thanks in advance for any answers!
>>>>>
>>>>> -- Tom Fine
>>>>>
>>>>>
>>>>
> 
>