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--- On Wed, 12/17/08, [log in to unmask] <[log in to unmask]> wrote:
 
***Like most national MICs (music information centres) they offer support to composers from or working in the country. Performances on the recordings could be from any source -- studio recordings, CBC concert recordings, the composer's own recordings (from a variety of sources), the CMC's own label (CentreDiscs), etc. -- and have nothing (directly) to do with the gov. 

 
Perhaps someone can explain to me how this would be legal. Perhaps the laws in Canada are very different from what we have in the US. It would seem to me that allowing free access to a broadcast or commercial recording would be illegal, unless there was a licensing fee involved. I have listened to several things at the site and many are of recent vintage...less than 50 years old.
 
Some years ago, back in the late 50's, in the US, the Koussevitzky Music Foundation distributed tapes of performances (done by the likes of the Boston Symphony) of music by US composers to a group of libraries. Access was limited, and, as I recall, it took a fair amount of cooperation from the AFM.
 
In this country I know of composers who have been refused access to concert recordings of their own works. The Union did not allow it. The thought of the Union and performing organizations allowing such things to be listened to...and dubbed...free of charge over the internet...seems amazing to me.
 
Karl