Print

Print


On Jan 2, 2009, at 9:04 PM, Richard L. Hess wrote:

>
> Just to clarify a little more...as I understand it, Lorenz and AEG  
> were two separate companies -- at least at one point.

...My pal specified Lorenz when I ask him about the brand of machine  
he was using in the Wehrmacht in 1944, also mentioning that it had a  
variable-speed transport adjustment.

>
>
>> Incidentally, being a 20-year-old swing fan he also used the
>> Wehrmacht's machines and elaborate antenna array to record Glenn
>> Miller's ABSIE broadcasts from England on 583kHz AM, at considerable
>> personal risk. Reception was apparently rock solid, and (ironically,
>> in view of the noiselessness of German recorded broadcasts) his  
>> off- air tapes also captured the surface noise of the original   
>> transcription discs.
>
> Antenna science is somewhat of a lost art. Apparently rhombic and  
> beverage antennas are superb in digging out signals, as are some  
> other topologies.

... A couple of my friend's off-air tapes survived WWII. I have a DAT  
copy of his recording of a Dec. 1944 Glenn Miller German language  
"ABSIE 514" broadcast from Britain, as monitored somewhere on what  
remained of the Eastern Front, probably Hungary. Reception is  
outstanding, to the point where one suspects the BBC studio  
transcription pick-up needed a new needle. Given the savagery that  
must have been going on in the immediate vicinity of the receiver,  
it's entirely surreal to hear Miller's calm voice and the strains of  
Moonlight Serenade wafting over the ether. However, as far as content  
is concerned there are no surprises: the same material is available  
on commercial CD, professionally transcribed from a set of the  
original discs.

Tony B.