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.."A corollary is that to give a proper orientation to the real knowledge
base of our profession as it is today, the master's degree should be a
two-year program. Not that that will happen; the *monetary return is so
small that I think many prospective students look long and skeptically at
the investment for even a one-year program."*
**

Reading these posts this morning, with some thoughts.  Something to
understand also is that over time as you all know, everything changes and
esp. practice in libraries, of all different types: one person solo
operation, small academic v large academic libraries, public library systems
where cataloging is already done for small branches etc school libraries,
and also science and special research libraries--that is a tall order for us
to think about our graduate students exploring their future careers at this
point.   If someone wishes to succeed in their future, it is an investment
for them.  1-2 years is not much imho for anyone interested in furthering
their career opportunities.  If someone with a background in IT dreams of
making 6 figure salaries in a library, it is not going to happen the same
way, and that is no secret, however on the same topic, any one who wants to
move up in an academic library career should know across the board, they
will need a library/information science degree to advance.
This term I have several students with PhDs in other areas who are returning
to earn their degrees for futures in libraries/information organizations,
many J.D lawyers have also found new career opportunities in the field, and
to someone determined to advance, 1-2 years is really a small sacrifice of
time.    I think it took me 3 years to complete my MLS at Albany, and I
worked full time, and commuted from NYC and Albany several hours a day
between work, school, and raising my family.   How many years it takes
really should not be the main focus of one's future goals.   just my two
cents this morning.....:-)

I'm actually amazed at some of the graduate students I see, juggling several
careers at once and continuing with school, it's not easy, however many are
doing it.  A growing trend in the past year I have seen, is a growing number
of graduate students living in other countries, not just with military
families but students living over seas with other work etc, it's amazing to
me when I used to think a 3 hour commute was tough.

Best, Karen

Karen Weaver, MLS
Adjunct Instructor Cataloging & Classification
The iSchool at Drexel University
College of Information Science & Technology
Philadelphia PA
email: [log in to unmask]

Electronic Resources Statistician
Duquesne University, Gumberg Library
Pittsburgh PA
email: [log in to unmask]



On Sun, Jan 11, 2009 at 3:53 PM, Richard Stewart <
[log in to unmask]> wrote:

> Suzanne and Karen, good points about keeping the terminology clear. It's
> actually quite a challenge to clarify the distinctions among, and the
> history of, all the different standards and protocols that intersect in
> modern cataloging. It makes my head hurt if I start thinking it through
> before the second cup of coffee.
>
> I have long thought that the cores of our curricula need to incorporate a
> longer and deeper look into the history, principles, and current practice of
> bibliographic control. A corollary is that to give a proper orientation to
> the real knowledge base of our profession as it is today, the master's
> degree should be a two-year program. Not that that will happen; the monetary
> return is so small that I think many prospective students look long and
> skeptically at the investment for even a one-year program.
>
> Richard A. Stewart
> Senior Cataloger
> Indian Trails Public Library District
> 355 South Schoenbeck Road
> Wheeling, Illinois 60090-4499
> USA
>
> Tel: 847-279-2214
> Fax: 847-4760
> [log in to unmask]
> htpp://www.itpld.lib.il.us
> >>> Karen Weaver <[log in to unmask]> 01/11/09 10:38 AM >>>
> Suzanne and all:
>
> ps  personally , I have never used the word "code" for cataloging-metadata
> work .  I'll have students with a programming background or hobby who like
> to compare it to other "coding" work and that is all fine if it works for
> them.   Since library catalogs esp contain a large amount of what is now
> called "legacy" data , I'm a strong supporter of historical understanding
> and perspective--even of the catalog.  ;-)        more on what a challenge
> for some today to understand the need for "structure" without seeming too
> "legacy-like"   (?)   ...
>
>
>
> On Sun, Jan 11, 2009 at 11:20 AM, Suzanne Stauffer <[log in to unmask]>
> wrote:
>
> > I think it is important to distinguish among "codes," "coding" and
> > "standards." ...
>