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For what it's worth, my degree in librarianship was a plain MA -- that is,
an academic degree rather than a professional one.   That was from Denver in
1969 (or 70, I forget which).  I had a thesis, and a research methods course
was required of all graduates.  At that time, I believe there were only a
few programs that offered an MA (I'm not sure that any do today) and it was
something that Denver was quite proud of at the time.   Of course, sometime
in the 80s the Denver program that I attended was eliminated by the
University. (The Dean was in Dallas at ALA, recruiting faculty, and got a
call from the University to desist and come home)


Janet Swan Hill, Professor
Associate Director for Technical Services
University of Colorado Libraries, CB184
Boulder, CO 80309
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     *****
"For we are catalogers, and therefore the elect of God.  To read is human;
to catalog, divine."  Charity Blackstock.  Dewey Death.



-----Original Message-----
From: Discussion List for issues related to cataloging & metadata education
& training [mailto:[log in to unmask]] On Behalf Of Suzanne Stauffer
Sent: Friday, May 29, 2009 9:47 AM
To: [log in to unmask]
Subject: [eduCAT] FW: [eduCAT] Whom do you pay attention to?

Yes, a thesis would develop research skills. However, few U.S. LIS programs
require a thesis. Our students have the option of doing a thesis, but the
vast majority elect to take the written qualifying exams.
 
Oxford