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There was also a film of Harold Bauer solo, and playing with the 
violinist (name? too early in the morning). Elman or someone else?

These are the only name instrumentalists I know of.

joe salerno


Michael Biel wrote:
> From: Roger Kulp <[log in to unmask]>
>> I would like to see a listing of these.Someone once told me there
>> are classical records,including one of Mischa Elman.Is there ?
> 
>                                             
> Elman's film is catalog #275, and it was in the first batch shown in
> 1926 and restored in 1976 for the 50th Anniversary celebration at MOMA. 
> Check out the web site of The Vitaphone Project.  
> http://www.picking.com/vitaphone.html    The public database listings
> have not been kept up to date, but by looking at them and the quarterly
> bulletins you can see what is known.  There are many classical and
> operatic films and discs, but they are usually are not on the front
> burners to be restored.  The grant by the Getty family to restore a
> large group of operatics had to be withdrawn due to death, so donations
> to restore that group are again being accepted.    
> 
> Some of the films are shown on Turner Classics and have been released on
> LaserDiscs and DVDs, usually as extras.  The best grouping of these are
> on the three-disc set of The Jazz Singer that was released last year. 
> There are annual screenings in NY and LA of the recent restorations, and
> last weekend at the NJ Jazz Bash, Ron Hutchinson repeated this year's
> show for us.  If any collector and archive holds any soundtrack disc,
> please report it to the Project.  Likewise, if any film without the
> discs are known, the Project needs to know this too.  
> 
> Mike Biel  [log in to unmask]  
> 
> 
> --- On Thu, 6/25/09, Jack Theakston <[log in to unmask]> wrote:
> 
> From: Jack Theakston <[log in to unmask]>
> Subject: Re: [ARSCLIST] Recording Innovations
> To: [log in to unmask]
> Date: Thursday, June 25, 2009, 3:08 PM
> 
> The Vitaphone discs did have a start point, which was ultimately your
> sync mark.  It was a little arrow on the inner point of the film, on
> which you synced up to a start point on the film.  The difficulty, of
> course, was if the film broke, you couldn't just slug it with one frame
> of leader because the cement splice couldn't take the stress.  Instead,
> you had to cut two or more frames out, leaving a noticeable slug. 
> Sound-on-film, of course, was no problem, because there's no way for it
> to drop out of sync.
> 
> With proper care, even on manual rewinds (which should all have a
> tension brake on them), a film should be returned in the same condition
> as the day it came in.
> 
> J. Theakston
> 
> 
> ________________________________
> From: George Brock-Nannestad <[log in to unmask]>
> To: [log in to unmask]
> Sent: Thursday, June 25, 2009 4:45:52 PM
> Subject: Re: [ARSCLIST] Recording Innovations
> 
> From: Patent Tactics, George Brock-Nannestad
> 
> just a short remark, re Bob Hodge:
> 
> 
>> Competent projectionists would splice in black film equal to the number of
>> frames damaged. Just a normal part of projection. 
>> Ideally, the rotational pivot should be midway in its travel for maximum
>> flexibility. It couldn't rotate 360 degrees due to the leads from the
>> tonearm. But more than enough to compensate for subtle difficulties. And why
>> a second set of discs were shipped with each film requiring them.  
>>
> 
> ----- at first I thought that having the pivot midway would compensate
> for 
> having put too many black frames into the gap, but then I remembered:
> there 
> is no synchronization mark on the Vitaphone disc, so when it is first
> put on 
> the turntable you do not know where it is on the turntable. For this
> reason 
> you might have to go back or forth to find the sync.
> 
> ----- by the way, the black film replacement would only work for silent 
> stock. When a frame was lost in a sound film, the best you could do as a
> 
> projectionist was to paint fade-in and fade-out on either side of the
> splice. 
> Re-sync would not happen after 20 frames anyway. I think that my worst 
> experience as a projectionist in our little cinema (35 mm Ernemann,
> though!) 
> was in manual rewind. If you got the reels up to speed and lost power in
> your 
> winding arm towards the end, the loop would rise above the reels, and if
> you 
> were not diligent, above 3 feet in height would threaten with havoc.
> What 
> could you do, except clamp your hand on the other reel, getting burn
> tracks 
> in your hand. I wore a left-hand leather glove after that. You did not
> want 
> to use the brake, because it would slow down the process to a safe
> speed. 
> Films had to take a lot of abuse (the reason why nitrate survived for so
> long-
> -it was not only more transparent but also much tougher than acetate)
>