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----- Original Message ----- 
From: "Patrick Feaster" <[log in to unmask]>
> On Thu, Jun 25, 2009 at 8:27 PM, David Seubert 
> <[log in to unmask]>wrote:
>> I was hoping that somebody had information on the take numbering/marking
>> system used by Emerson.
> Since nobody has stepped forward with a definitive answer, I gather the
> Emerson "system" is as yet an unresolved mystery.  Here are the marking
> patterns I see in my own small collection:
> Almost* all 9" and 10" Emersons have the hyphenated number (e.g., 3701-1,
> 4983-2), invariably with both parts in the same handwriting or font, 
> usually
> recessed but sometimes upraised.  Sometimes the final digit is followed by
> an X.  So far, this is all consistent with the second number serving as a
> take marker, with both numbers being added to the original wax master
> (recessed) or the negative father (upraised) simultaneously.  This was how
> Columbia had shown takes, and that's where Emerson had spent years working
> before founding his own company, so he would have been intimately familiar
> with the "hyphenated take" format, which also turns up on Little Wonder 
> and
> other Emerson projects.
>   (* A few Emersons just have the catalog number and side letter, A/B, in
> the wax.)
>
I have always assumed that the hyphenated number following the Emerson
matrix number indicated the "take" of that recording...in fact, as I recall
(which is not all that great as I approach my biblically-assigned "three
score and ten"...!) I own records which confirm that assumption!

However, the Emerson situation is further confused by the fact that
once they started recording for other clients (i.e. GG!), they assigned
"control numbers" in a 3### series to leased (or intended for lease?)
recordings; these numbers cover MUCH of the GG catalog, as well
as other labels such as "Everybody's"...?!

One thing we could use (I don't have the spare time to create this!)
would be a m#-vs-ctrl# database/list covering these ERL 3K numbers?!
It is, of course, quite possible that ERL matrix numbers for the more
obscure 3K-ctrl# items are long lost to history (unless/until someone
finds the ERL ledgers stuffed in some yet-to-be-discovered wall;
there is/was a famous case of British ledgers having been found
thusly, the details of which have escaped my geriatric "memory"...?!)

Steven C. Barr