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I used Koha for teaching and I have each student with their own logon and
did reports to grade them.  I also initially had in class practice for a
couple of hours to familiarize the students with Koha.  Once they understood
what to do, they did pretty well executing the exercises.  I also used their
completed exercises to encourage them to discuss how they completed their
work and how they interacted with MARC, AACR2, and ISBD to complete the
assignments in KOHA.
My assignments were always for materials which would have incomplete (read
old AACR) or incorrect WorldCat records, and they realized "copying" would
not necessary get them a "good" answer.  I didn't discourage them from
talking with one another for the process, since I stress that cataloging can
be a collaborative effort, and requires intellectual decisions, it is not
just data entry.  The students learned to challenge one another, and
developed good eyes, and classification practices.
Dawn Loomis



On Fri, Aug 21, 2009 at 6:04 AM, Suzanne Stauffer <[log in to unmask]> wrote:

> Is or has anyone used Koha to teach cataloging? If so, would you mind
> sharing how you did it?
>
> I finally got the company to respond. David Bavousett set up 5 "instances"
> and 5 "staff clients", complete with bibliographic records. That would be
> great for staff training, but I'm having trouble seeing how I would use this
> in a cataloging course. Obviously, I don't need or want bibliographic
> records. I want the students to create and add records, not search for them.
> I've asked for help and tried using the documentation, but can't find
> anything on using it in teaching.
>
> I can see how students can add records to the databases, but what I can't
> figure out is how I would find the records they created to grade them. Even
> more importantly, with only 5 bibliographic databases, either the students
> will all be cataloging different items (which would make grading oh so much
> fun), or I'll have to divide them into 5 groups, with students in each group
> cataloging different items. That means I'd have between 1 and 6 different
> items per group. I'm assuming that the system won't allow duplicate records
> in a single database; if it did, it would be too much to expect students not
> to "just take a peek at how superstudent did it."
>
> I'm probably missing something extemely elementary. Can anyone help?
> Suzanne M. Stauffer, Ph.D.
> Assistant Professor
> School of Library and Information Science
> Louisiana State University
> 275 Coates Hall
> Baton Rouge, LA 70803
> (225)578-1461
> Fax: (225)578-4581
> [log in to unmask]
>
>