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Dave, these things are cool! I never heard of this company before. I was always looking at later 
ones, Seeburg or Rockola. I like this earlier look even better, it shows you how the sausage is 
made. Thanks for sharing the images.

-- Tom Fine

----- Original Message ----- 
From: "David Breneman" <[log in to unmask]>
To: <[log in to unmask]>
Sent: Saturday, October 03, 2009 12:40 PM
Subject: [ARSCLIST] Good Sounding Jukeboxes (Was: Living Presence promo copies)


> --- On Thu, 10/1/09, Tom Fine <[log in to unmask]> wrote:
>
>> For a long time, I had dreams of a classic 45-singles
>> jukebox, but then when I started shopping for a
>> well-restored one, it turned out they mostly sound like crap
>> due to both mid-grade to low-grade phono pickups and also
>> the fact that most singles sound like crap from Play One.
>
> Some of the best-sounding jukeboxes made were the AMI F and G
> series from 1954-1956.  They had GE VR-II pickups (or similar
> GE models) and separate bass and treble horns that give
> really great sound.  Probably some of the best sounding
> jukeboxes ever.  They're still fairly reasonably priced
> because they are rather boxy looking compared to the
> "Jetsons" styling that came later.  The G-200 has a bass
> speaker that runs the length of the cabinet to bounce
> off the floor.  The F and G 80 and 120 have folded bass
> horns under the record changer that also bounce off
> the floor.  A treble horn sits on top.
>
> Here's a picture of my AMI G-200 in my workshop:
>
> http://tildebang.com/jukebox/images/ami-in-workshop.jpg
>
> And here's a picture of a G-120 I restored for a friend:
>
> http://tildebang.com/jukebox/images/ami-g120.jpg
>
>
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