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The Stroh I played many years ago (for David Sager's Fearless Pie-in-the-Sky Orchestra) had one large horn pointing forward and one small one pointed at my ear when I played. At least the small horn was adjustable and I think the larger one had some limited range of motion. 

The Stroh sound is very directional (as well as nasal) and without that smaller horn it is impossible for a player to hear him/herself in an ensemble setting. Did all Strohs have that feature?

The instrument on the Lark site seems definitely not authentic, or at least not a Stroh. But maybe it's the style used by Rumanian Gypsy masters...

James

>>> RA Friedman <[log in to unmask]> 10/15/2009 1:44 PM >>>

Instruments with the horn at about 9-10 o'clock were from the acoustic age.
This one that is for sale seems like an updated idea; not authentic.
Correct?

2009/10/15 George Brock-Nannestad <[log in to unmask]>

>  From: Patent Tactics, George Brock-Nannestad
>
> NO, NO, NO ! ! !
>
> that is NOT the type used for recording !!!
>
> Oh, why perpetuate something that is historically incorrect. The seller
> speaks through his ........
>
> Kind regards (well, kind?),
>
>
> George
>
>
> > How could some one resist?
> >
> >   http://larkinthemorning.com/product.aspx?p=VIO064
> >
> > --
> > Best regards,
> >  Danger                            mailto:[log in to unmask]
>



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