Print

Print


A  quick and easy test  is a drop of MEK solvent on the edge... styrene will dissolve instantly .... 
dnw 

--- On Mon, 11/30/09, Aaron Levinson <[log in to unmask]> wrote:

> From: Aaron Levinson <[log in to unmask]>
> Subject: Re: [ARSCLIST] Pressing Haze: Help Needed
> To: [log in to unmask]
> Date: Monday, November 30, 2009, 4:20 PM
> I'm not nearly as versed in this area
> as you or Don or George or Michael but something innately
> makes me think it is a chemical issue as well. I'm not sure
> if this is vinyl or styrene is there are a quick and dirty
> test for this?
> 
> AA
> 
> 
> 
> Steven Smolian wrote:
> > This is true of their 10" discs as well.  It's
> pre-record sealing time.
> > 
> > Some of the examples I've seen were new, still in the
> internal cellophane sleve.
> > 
> > There are similar problems with Mercury's covers of
> the period, on some of which the coating bubbles, other
> where is fades and peels.
> > 
> > Ill hazzard a guess that its a chemical issue, as I've
> only seen this over the last 10 or so years.  I wonder
> what the early Mercs at LOC look like?
> > 
> > Steve Smolian
> > 
> > 
> > 
> > ----- Original Message ----- From: "Michael Biel"
> <[log in to unmask]>
> > To: <[log in to unmask]>
> > Sent: Monday, November 30, 2009 6:45 PM
> > Subject: Re: [ARSCLIST] Pressing Haze: Help Needed
> > 
> > 
> >> Aaron Levinson wrote:
> >>> Don-
> >>> 
> >>> You are suggesting that one pass with a very
> worn stylus produced this kind of greying? That seems kind
> of hard to fathom
> >> 
> >> Not if this is a styrene pressing rather than
> vinyl.  I have seen microgroove styrene pressings
> absolutely shredded when played by a 78 stylus or a stylus
> with a sharp facet.  You haven't told us if this
> pressing is vinyl or styrene.
> >>> considering all
> >>> the other anecdotal evidence that suggests
> that Mercury and Emarcy seem to exhibit this "record cancer"
> when almost no other labels do?
> >> 
> >> Funny thing is that many early Mercury and Emarcy
> pressings are styrene when practically none others
> were.  A few Harmony and many Gold/Silver Crest LPs are
> also styrene, and Decca was using a slightly different type
> of styrene in the late 50s.  Most Columbia 45s were
> styrene.  Back-cueing them by DJs can kill the first
> seconds of these.
> >> 
> >>> I have seen many records that have been played
> by a worn stylus and are greying but none that I have ever
> seen, stop so abruptly as this record does.
> >>> 
> >>> AA
> >>> 
> >>> 
> >> 
> >> Since most microgroove records are vinyl, I would
> expect that this would be almost everybody's
> experience.  But I have seen it happen.
> >> 
> >> Mike Biel  [log in to unmask]
> >> 
> >>> Don Chichester wrote:
> >>>>  In a message dated 11/30/2009
> 5:12:06 P.M. Eastern Standard Time, [log in to unmask]
> writes:
> >>>> 
> >>>> Mike  Gray wrote:
> >>>> 
> >>>>> Played with a *very* worn stylus
> that's damaged the groove  -
> >>>>> Groove wear is a potential culprit
> Mike but in this case it can be conclusively ruled out. This
> haze stops dead two thirds of the way through track 2 only
> on the first side. The worn stylus theory is simply not an
> option with a condition like this. I think it is far more
> likely to be some kind of mold, storage and/or
> pressing  defect.
> >>>>> 
> >>>> 
> >>>> AA
> >>>> 
> >>>> 
> >>>> 
> >>>> My experience is that this exactly the
> cause of the haze.  The former owner played the record
> two-thirds of the way through track two--then noticed 
> the wear and lifted the stylus at that point.
> >>>>  Don Chichester
> >>>> 
> >>>> 
> >>> 
> >>> 
> >> 
> > 
>