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I dated it as ca. 1931 because it has a number of Victor records in  the 
storage compartment, all with catalogue numbers in the high 22000 and, I  
think, low 24000 series.  It also has a bunch of RCA home recording  discs, some 
of which have sound on them.   The machine is a floor  model, not a table 
model.
 
I do think there was a Wilcox-Gay blank with the others, too.   
 
Was RCA manufacturing the home recording credenzas in the late  1930s?   My 
aunt and uncle owned one with a single arm.  The  microphone that came with 
it survives.  I saved it when the credenza went  out to the curb with the 
trash.  I recall that it was functional.   Plug it in, talk into it, put your 
finger under the stylus, and feel it  vibrate.
 
Paul Charosh
 
 
In a message dated 12/1/09 6:57:43 P.M. Eastern Standard Time,  
[log in to unmask] writes:

If your  friend provided a model number we would be able to get exact  
information.  But I was going to question the two arm aspect, because  in 
1931 this would have been a version of something like an RCA RAE 45  
which recorded on the RCA pre-grooved plastic discs with a single  arm.  
A horseshoe shaped weight was placed over the reproducer and a  rotary 
switch under the arm would be set to put the output of the amp into  the 
arm to vibrate the needle which widened the pre-groove.  In the  LATE 30s 
there were many brands of two-armed recording machines that  almost all 
were just like the Wilcox-Gay Recordio.  I suppose GE made  one also.  
Most of these were table models, but there were some floor  models.  
These are so common in perfect condition it is probably not  worth fixing 
if it is one of these.  If it IS from the early 30s, it  probably is 
worth restoring but I am doubtful it is from the early 30s if  it has two 
arms.  Provide us with a model number or a  photo.