Print

Print


----- Original Message ----- 
From: "Tom Fine" <[log in to unmask]>
> I'll add one more thing to this discussion. At least one of the many flash 
> recorders out there, the Zoom H2, can also act as a USB audio interface. 
> So you could have both a portable recorder (in the Zoom's case, a portable 
> recorder capable of 4-channel surround recording) and a somewhat quick and 
> dirty USB interface all in one device. I just recently used the Zoom to 
> make a bunch of cassette transfers, some music and some spoken word, all 
> of decent to very good (as good as cassette is capable) audio quality. I 
> transferred at 44.1kHz/24-bit and was very happy with the results.
> What I'd like to know from the original poster, Bill Fliss -- what are 
> your intended uses and what is your budget? If you are doing high-quality 
> professional transfers, you'll want something much different (and, alas, 
> more expensive), than if you are "putting my LPs into my iPod" or 
> transferring a stack of worn 78's for personal use. Also, if your input 
> devices are balanced or unbalanced output, consumer or professional 
> operating levels, is important to know. That said, one thing to add to my 
> recommendation of the CardDeluxe is that you can jumper-set its operating 
> level and its input and output circuits are comfortable receiving and 
> feeding unbalanced lines. So to interface with consumer electronics, all 
> you need is to set the jumpers at -10 nominal level and buy four 1/4-inch 
> to RCA adapters.
> I use a M-Audio 2496 exactly the same why John does -- as a 
> listening/preview workstation card. It does the job fine.  One problem I 
> had using it for a transfer interface was that the computer's lousy 
> grounding structure created hum when connected to a properly-grounded tape 
> output from a well-made Japanese receiver (set up to tape FM broadcasts). 
> That problem was solved with Radio Shack's in-line audio transfermer 
> cable.
>
Passing note...
What I plan to do is to terminate the cartridge leads from an older 
ceramic-cartridge "record
player" in a "mimi-phone-plug"...which I can then plug into the "Line In" 
jack of my sound
card, since a ceramic cartridge puts out a line-level (c. 1 volt) signal! I 
used a similar setup
for many years...feeding the cartridge output from my c.1960 RCA "record 
player" into
the "Line In" of a Sony r2r machine which was the functional centre of my 
"sound
system" at the time (and could be hooked up to a Sony cassette deck, 
allowing me to
put countless 78's onto cassettes!).

Steven C. Barr