Print

Print


From: Andrew Hamilton <[log in to unmask]>
> Thank you, Goran. I had not heard of the term, son, for stamper. I
> like that one, but I don't know if the IASA had heard of that, either.


Actually I don't think that anyone has ever heard of it.  I have read
hundreds of books, articles, instruction manuals, guidebooks, etc. about
recording techniques and technology dating from all eras of the
industry, but have never seen anything relating the stamper to the word
"son".  Can you cite me some specific sources in print that use this
term?  I'm not saying that it has never been used, but it must be quite
uncommon, at least in English.

Mike Biel   [log in to unmask]  



> Here's what they have on their page about masters:

" Master disc. A finished disc recording in edited or approved form from
which copies can be made in the recording producing process. It is used
to
produce a reverse copy or metal matrix which has ridges instead of
grooves
that is then used as a _stamper_ for producing copies in the single-step
process, or is used to produce a metal mother in the three-step
process."


> Also, thanks for the clarification, Tim W. I had thought that by "two
> examples," you meant that there were only two examples, not, "here are two
> (of many) examples..."  Cordially,  Andrew


On 12/11/09 6:16 PM, "Goran Finnberg" <[log in to unmask]> wrote:

Andrew Hamilton:
>>> Ok, but what about the stampers, which
>>> are neither mothers nor lacquers?
 
Timothy Wisniewski:
>> 1 sound disc (metal mother)
>> 1 sound disc (lacquer)
>> 1 sound disc (metal stamper)
 
Goran Finnberg:
> The first thing after the Laquer is the metal Father.
> 
> Then comes the metal Mother.
> 
> And then we get the metal stampers or more aptly put the metal Sons.
> 
> 1 sound disc (lacquer)
> 1 sound disc (metal Father)
> 1 sound disc (metal Mother)
> 1 sound disc (metal Son or stamper)
> 
> The Laquer and the Mother can be audioned by an ordinary playback stylus.
> 
> The Father and the Sons, ( pressing stampers ) are inverted and can only be
> played by a special stylus that looks like an inverted V.
> 
>