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Hi Jane,

At the University of Illinois our system has been open to Google and 
other bots for several years.  Over 7,000 collection-level records and 
several hundered full finding aids are routinely harvested by Google and 
other bots.  Our system is a PHP-driven database application, not static 
HTML.

We have never run into an issue with server overload.  I suspect it 
would not be a problem for you, since server load is significantly 
higher to serve up a PHP using our system than it would be to serve up 
an equivalent page in static HTML.

Best,

Chris Prom
Fulbright Scholar
University of Dundee
United Kingdom

Jane Stevenson wrote:
> Hi all,
>
> >>Basically what I'm trying to do is get away from creating static 
> html pages to store on our server and just present the view and print 
> options through xml and xsl.
>
> This has prompted me to think about a rather different question - 
> we're actually thinking of creating static html pages in addition to 
> our XSL generated pages because we want our descriptions to be exposed 
> to Google. Alternatively we could create pre-generated searches. We 
> don't just open up our system to robots due to problems with 
> overloading the system. Has anyone had any experience of this kind of 
> thing? It would be useful to get your thoughts.
>
> cheers,
> Jane.
>
> **************************************************************
> Jane Stevenson
>
> Archives Hub Co-ordinator
> Mimas
> University of Manchester
> Email:   [log in to unmask]
> http://www.archiveshub.ac.uk
>
>
>
>
> Fox, Michael wrote:
>> There is a proof of concept stylesheet on the EAD help pages that 
>> does this, namely use XSL:FO to generate an XML document in 
>> Formatting Objects syntax (XSL:FO) that an FO processor could 
>> subsequently convert to PDF.     If you use Oxygen, the necessary 
>> tools (an XSLT engine and the FOP processor)  are already bundled 
>> in.   I believe the same is true of the XML Spy software.
>>
>>  
>>
>> There is also another stylesheet at the same location that goes from 
>> EAD directly to WordML using a standard XSL transformation, though I 
>> do not know if the syntax of this stylesheet still reflects 
>> Microsoft's current schema for Word.    After transformation, the 
>> output can be opened directly in a recent version of Word and edited 
>> or printed as required.
>>
>>  
>>
>> In these scenarios, your EAD XML instance could truly serve as your 
>> canonical version.
>>
>>  
>>
>> Finally, there is another option with one of the EAD Cookbook 
>> stylesheets that produces an HTML page that has no links and so could 
>> be imported into Word and printed from there.  A bit messier but far 
>> easier to pull off.
>>
>>  
>>
>> Michael Fox
>>
>>  
>>
>>  
>>
>> *From:* Encoded Archival Description List [mailto:[log in to unmask]] *On 
>> Behalf Of *Ethan Gruber
>> *Sent:* Wednesday, December 09, 2009 3:37 PM
>> *To:* [log in to unmask]
>> *Subject:* Re: use of <otherfindaid> tag
>>
>>  
>>
>> You can create XSLT stylesheets that contain Formatting Objects 
>> specifications, and then serialize to PDF dynamically with calls to 
>> the fop processor.
>>
>> Ethan
>>
>> On Wed, Dec 9, 2009 at 4:25 PM, Franks, Russell 
>> <[log in to unmask] <mailto:[log in to unmask]>> wrote:
>>
>> Thank you Jane and Michele for the clarifications and thoughts.
>>
>> Michele, I like your method of generating a print page via the style 
>> sheet. Is this done with javascript? Or is it an xsl template that 
>> dynamically creates a new printer friendly page?
>>
>> Basically what I'm trying to do is get away from creating static html 
>> pages to store on our server and just present the view and print 
>> options through xml and xsl.
>>
>> Thanks - Russ
>>
>>
>> Russell Franks
>> Librarian
>> Special and Archival Collections
>> Phillips Memorial Library
>> Providence College
>> 1 Cunningham Square
>> Providence, RI 02918-0001
>> 401-865-2578
>> [log in to unmask] <mailto:[log in to unmask]>
>> [log in to unmask] <mailto:[log in to unmask]>
>> http://www.providence.edu/archives
>>
>> -----Original Message-----
>> From: Encoded Archival Description List [mailto:[log in to unmask] 
>> <mailto:[log in to unmask]>] On Behalf Of Jane Stevenson
>> Sent: Wednesday, December 09, 2009 4:04 AM
>> To: [log in to unmask] <mailto:[log in to unmask]>
>>
>> Subject: Re: use of <otherfindaid> tag
>>
>> Hi there,
>>
>> We (our contributors) use <archref> to link to separately described 
>> parts of a finding aid, such as
>> where a description is extremely large and benefits from being 
>> divided up. This is in line with the
>> guidance: 'Examples of such materials include a record group and one 
>> of its large series (which
>> might have separate EAD-encoded finding aids)'
>>
>> However, our contributors can also use it to link to other parts of 
>> the same finding aid, which may
>> not be strictly within the guidelines, but it seems to be the best 
>> choice for this.
>> http://www.archiveshub.ac.uk/arch/archref.shtml. It is not totally 
>> straightforward for us to
>> implement these links, due to the way the Archives Hub is set up as a 
>> distributed system with
>> machine interfaces.
>>
>> We use <otherfindaid> to indicate other finding aids for the same 
>> material:
>> http://www.archiveshub.ac.uk/arch/other.shtml
>>
>> So that differs from linking to other finding aids that are related 
>> but not representing the same
>> material. The guidelines do say that it is for 'Information about 
>> additional or alternative guides
>> to the described material'. When contributors use this tag, they are 
>> usually pointing to a more
>> detailed resource rather than the same content in a different format, 
>> but I would assume that it
>> could be the same.
>>
>> Jane.
>>
>> **************************************************************
>> Jane Stevenson
>>
>> Archives Hub Co-ordinator
>> http://www.archiveshub.ac.uk
>>
>>
>> Michele R Combs wrote:
>>  > My understanding of archref is that it's for links to other 
>> collections of archival material.  We
>>  > use archref to link to related collections.  For example, we would 
>> use archref to link from the
>>  > finding aid for the papers of John Smith Jr. to the finding aid 
>> for the papers of his father,
>>  > John Smith Sr., or the papers of his son, John Smith III.
>>  >
>>  > My understanding of otherfindaid is that it's for links to finding 
>> aids that are different in
>>  > content, not just in file format.  For example, we might include 
>> in the otherfindaid section a
>>  > link to an Excel spreadsheet that provides a finer level of detail 
>> for a set of John Smith Jr's
>>  > photographs, or a link to a published catalog of John Smith Jr's 
>> letters, or similar.
>>  >
>>  > To simply point to another version of the online finding aid, we 
>> have a link at the top of each
>>  > one that says "Printer friendly version." This link is generated 
>> by our XSL style sheet and is
>>  > not hard-coded into our EAD.
>>  >
>>  > Michele
>>  >
>>  > (be green - don't print this email!) ~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~ Michele 
>> Combs Manuscripts Librarian
>>  > Special Collections Research Center Syracuse University Libraries 
>> 222 Waverly Ave. Syracuse, NY
>>  > 13244 315-443-2081 [log in to unmask] <mailto:[log in to unmask]> 
>> ~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~
>>  >
>>  >
>>  >
>>  >
>>  > -----Original Message----- From: Encoded Archival Description List 
>> [mailto:[log in to unmask] <mailto:[log in to unmask]>] On Behalf
>>  > Of Franks, Russell Sent: Tuesday, December 08, 2009 4:00 PM To: 
>> [log in to unmask] <mailto:[log in to unmask]> Subject: use
>>  > of <otherfindaid> tag
>>  >
>>  > Hello,
>>  >
>>  > Is anyone using the <otherfindaid> tag to describe or point to 
>> another version of a finding aid,
>>  > such as a PDF version of the finding aid for patrons to dl or print?
>>  >
>>  > According to the tag library <otherfindaid> "is used to indicate 
>> the existence of additional
>>  > finding aids;" and that "The <archref> element may be used to give 
>> a formal citation to the other
>>  > finding aid or to link to an online version of it."
>>  >
>>  > It doesn't appear that the <otherfindaid> tag is limited to other 
>> finding aids created by
>>  > differing institutions or to legacy versions of the same finding aid.
>>  >
>>  > Also do I have to use the <archref> tag to link to the PDF? Since 
>> the PDF version of the finding
>>  > aid is not "separately described archival materials of special 
>> interest", it seems to me that the
>>  > use of the <extref> would be better suited for this purpose.
>>  >
>>  >
>>  > Thanks in advance for your thoughts -
>>  >
>>  > Russell Franks Librarian Special and Archival Collections Phillips 
>> Memorial Library Providence
>>  > College 1 Cunningham Square Providence, RI 02918-0001 401-865-2578 
>> [log in to unmask] <mailto:[log in to unmask]>
>>  > [log in to unmask] <mailto:[log in to unmask]> 
>> http://www.providence.edu/archives
>>  >
>>
>>  
>>


-- 
Chris Prom
Assistant University Archivist
University of Illinois Archives

Please note I am on sabbatical at the University of Dundee during the 2009-10 academic year