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Blacklight is capable of indexing all elements of an EAD guide, but why
virgobeta.lib.virginia.edu is not, I don't know.  I don't work on blacklight
for the University of Virginia, so I don't have control over how they are
indexing the university's collection of finding aids.  That said, I have
written the stylesheet that coverts the EAD-for-coins adaptation I used for
the UVA Art Museum coin collection into the solr schema that blacklight
uses, and the coins are findable in Virgo Beta (example:
http://virgobeta.lib.virginia.edu/catalog?q=postumus&qt=search).  In the
solr schema for blacklight, there is a text field that serves as a catchall
for full text searching.  I have used this to store all sorts of contextual
information about coins, so it can definitely be used to store the textual
bits of the dsc in a regular type of finding aid.

Ethan

On Wed, Dec 30, 2009 at 9:27 AM, Rees, John (NIH/NLM) [E] <
[log in to unmask]> wrote:

>  Similar to Michael’s approach at MNHS, at NLM we’re able to point our
> enterprise site search tool, Vivisimo, to our source xml and return a html
> view. We did the same when we used to just serve static html, only now we
> point to our DLXS-hosted content that sits on a different server. We
> specifically do not index our ILS and MedlinePlus hits can often overwhelm
> search results. Vivisimo does natural “clustering” depending on the number
> of hits within a document and some other algorithms. Vivisimo can index any
> number of document types including the Microsoft suite, pdf, etc. I’m
> experimenting with using it to index external data sources as well.
>
>
>
> Being an enterprise solution it is a costly product, however. And, like
> Michael describes, we believe in finding the right tool for the job at hand
> within the limits of our corporate infrastructure/politics. DLXS provides
> content-specific functionality, Vivisimo provides a general bucket
> discovery, MARC for the ILS and OCLC, Marc-to-NLM XML for our external data
> subscribers like PubMed, etc. As we explore other “next generation”
> discovery alternatives like Blacklight, Primo, etc., we’ll evaluate them
> against existing functional requirements and our user needs, which can be
> quite diverse. Most of our public customers are not looking for ILS content.
>
>
>
> John
>
>
>
>
>
> John P. Rees, MA, MLIS
>
> Curator, Archives and Modern Manuscripts
>
> History of Medicine Division, MSC 3819
>
> National Library of Medicine
>
> 8600 Rockville Pike
>
> Bethesda, MD 20894
>
>
>
>
>
>
>
>
>
> *From:* Fox, Michael [mailto:[log in to unmask]]
> *Sent:* Monday, December 28, 2009 11:49 AM
>
> *To:* [log in to unmask]
> *Subject:* Re: Adding EAD to the 'layer of discovery'?
>
>
>
> Hello,
>
>
>
> The Minnesota Historical Society has taken a different approach to
> presenting data from a variety of data stores and in a variety of data
> formats through a single, integrated search.
>
>
>
> If you go to our website, www.mnhs.org, you will find a standard Search
> box in the upper right hand corner.  If you enter a term, say something
> Minnesotan like the name Johnson, the resulting page will provide a list of
> results from multiple sources: our Web site (html  pages largely), our
> library catalog (an Aleph OPAC); finding aids (in EAD XML of course), our
> photo and art collections (relational databases with linked images),  the
> text of the *Minnesota History *journal (searchable PDFs), and *Minnesota
> Place Names* (another relational database).    If you selected the Search
> for People option, several other sources would be available: the state's
> birth and death records, state censuses,  and a veterans' grave index.  The
> museum catalog will be added next.
>
>
>
> The Society also hosts a multi-institution, multi-state portal called the
> Great Rivers Network.  Its prototype web site, greatriversnetwork.org,
> adds information from other sources and repositories including several
> ContentDM photo databases.
>
>
>
> As I said, we have taken a different approach.   We have made several
> attempts at the one-tool-serves-all approach beginning with an NEH project
> 17 years ago to enter museum metadata in MARC syntax into our OPAC.    In
> our most recent initiative, we looked at several options and tried one
> Pentagon-strength search engine.   The challenges to this approach are
> significant.   What we discovered was that one either has to put up
> substantial funds to induce the vendor to build links to data sources
> outside the mainstream of their use base, twist your data into a pretzel to
> fit what's there, or wait for the user base to catch up to where we wanted
> to be.  That’s what seems to be happening in the OPAC world.   We were not
> interested in trying to stuff our finding aids into Dublin Core or even
> perhaps in putting all our eggs into one basket.
>
>
>
> Instead we have looked to use best of breed tools for each application and
> web services to extract what need from each.  Of course, we would like to
> minimize the number of tools we have to support and want to be as open
> source as possible or at least be in an environment where there is a robust
> community of institutions with similar needs around a common application.
> For us, that will be something more specialized than the world of library
> systems, even academic library systems.
>
>
>
> For the moment, what we are looking for is a better toolkit for ingesting
> interesting but unique data from some of our partners: in spreadsheets, word
> processing documents, PC databases like FileMaker and Access, as well as
> special purpose tools like Past Perfect.   Too much hands on massaging for
> the moment.  Any suggestions?
>
>
>
> Michael Fox
>
>
>
>
>
>
>
> *From:* Encoded Archival Description List [mailto:[log in to unmask]] *On Behalf
> Of *Custer, Mark
> *Sent:* Monday, December 28, 2009 8:13 AM
> *To:* [log in to unmask]
> *Subject:* Re: Adding EAD to the 'layer of discovery'?
>
>
>
> Thanks for pointing that amazing resource out, as it’s been a favorite of
> mine ever since I first saw it at the Computers in Libraries conference in
> 2008 (and I think that the new updates are even better!).  But it isn’t what
> I had in mind, since it is only indexing a fraction of the EAD record (i.e.,
> it’s not including, for just one example, <unittitle>’s in the <dsc>).
>
>
>
> Anyhow, I’m not suggesting that the entire EAD should be included in the
> OPAC, I’m just trying to figure out who is doing so right now.   In the
> past, only MARC records were able to uploaded into an ILS, but this is
> obviously changing now with the proliferation of “discovery layers” (and in
> those two examples I provided earlier, both of those OPACs permit searching
> throughout the entire EAD, even though neither of those resources are the
> primary gateway for their EAD records).
>
>
>
> One final example that I’ll point out, even though it doesn’t search EAD
> records, is the Hathi Trust Digital Library:
>
> http://catalog.hathitrust.org/
>
>
>
> Which is a great illustration, since right now they have 2 ways to search
> their resources:
>
>
>
> 1) “About” their items searches the MARC records
>
> 2) “Within” their items searches the full-text from the OCR
>
>
>
> In this case, though, entire EAD records (not just their MARC derivatives)
> would still fall into the “about” camp.  Nevertheless, they are rarely
> included in their entirety in the OPAC (but it’s now possible to do just
> that, with a bit of extra work, of course).
>
>
>
>
>
> Mark
>
>
>
>
>
> *From:* Encoded Archival Description List [mailto:[log in to unmask]] *On Behalf
> Of *Aikens, Barbara
> *Sent:* Wednesday, December 23, 2009 11:29 AM
> *To:* [log in to unmask]
> *Subject:* Re: Adding EAD to the 'layer of discovery'?
>
>
>
> I think the newly re-engineered Smithsonian’s Collections Search Center
> does this, but perhaps I’m not fully understanding the question.   The
> Search Center contains MARC records, and links to EAD finding aids, and
> other resources.  I’m pretty sure that Ching-Hsien created a metadata model
> and an interface or interfaces to harvest data from multiple datasets, from
> all sources – museums, libraries, and archives.   I’m probably not
> explaining it very well.
>
>
>
> Here’s the link http://collections.si.edu/search/
>
>
>
> Ching-Hsien would be happy to answer any questions.
>
>
>
> Happy Holidays!
>
>
>
> Barbara D. Aikens
>
>
>
> Chief, Collections Processing
>
> Archives of American Art, Smithsonian Institution
>
> Ph: 202-633-7941
>
> email:  [log in to unmask]
>
>
>
> *Mailing Address*
>
> Archives of American Art, Smithsonian Institution
>
> PO Box 37012
>
> Victor Bldg., Suite 2200, MRC 937
>
> Washington, DC  20013-7012
>
>
>
>
>
>
>
> *From:* Encoded Archival Description List [mailto:[log in to unmask]] *On Behalf
> Of *Custer, Mark
> *Sent:* Tuesday, December 22, 2009 3:23 PM
> *To:* [log in to unmask]
> *Subject:* Adding EAD to the 'layer of discovery'?
>
>
>
> I’m curious if anyone on the list has experience with adding their EAD
> documents into a larger discovery system?
>
>
>
> Here are two examples of what  I mean:
>
>
>
> ·         Triangle Research Library Network now indexes (and displays)
> entire EAD documents.
>
> Example (in which I’ve restricted my results to “archival materials” and
> entered “ammons” as my keyword):
>
> http://search.trln.org/search?Nty=1&Ntk=Keyword&Ntt=ammons&N=200092
>
>
>
> ·         University of Chicago library’s implementation of AquaBrowser
> seems to index entire EAD documents.
>
> Example (in which I’ve searched for “American Automobile Brief History",
> quotes included, and where the first 3 results returned should be for
> archival finding aids):
>
>
> http://lens.lib.uchicago.edu/?q=%22american%20automobile%20brief%20history%22
>
>
>
> So, this leads me to three questions in particular:
>
>
>
> 1.       Can you point me to any other online examples of “discovery
> tools” that are ingesting entire EAD documents?  Summon, Encore, Primo,
> Blacklight, etc.??? (but, again, I’m not asking about OPACS that only search
> a MARC surrogate of the EAD)
>
>
>
> 2.       For those of you that are including the entire EAD in your
> library’s discovery tool, did you already have surrogate MARC records for
> those collections in your catalog?  If so, how are you dealing with those
> now that you’re adding the EAD?
>
>
>
> 3.       What do you think of whole retrieval experience (advanced search
> options, facets, incorporation into the relevancy algorithm, etc.)?
>
>
>
> Thanks in advance for any and all advice and/or other examples that might
> be out there,
>
>
>
>
>
> Mark Custer
>
>
>