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I second that. I use Waves restoration bundle. It is good if used while 
using your ears. Flying blind will get you crap.
Shai

Lou Judson wrote:
> Here's a dos cetanvos response - I find SoundSoap can be destructive 
> if used in amounts that are effective - inother words, close to useless.
>
> I have Izotope RX and find it can be remarkably effective, but again 
> as with all noise redution, moderation is essential. You can reduce 
> noise only up to the point where it begins to detract from the desired 
> sounds. And often multiple gentle passes will be more effective than 
> one severe application. Almost always you want to back off from the 
> initial settings, in my experience.
>
> I just used RX on a beautiful live recording I did last week to remove 
> the sound of the hall's lights humming and the AC whooshing. It can be 
> stunningly effective - in moderation!
>
> Knowing where to stop is part of the art and the vital part of good 
> ears in the entire process. It's a bit like knowing when the playback 
> is "good enough" and when it is just showing the warts in the old 
> media...
>
> I'd rather hear some surfece noise than a dull overprocessed transfer!
>
> <L>
>
> On Jan 17, 2010, at 2:21 PM, RaphaŽl Parejo-Coudert wrote:
>
>> I'm actually working on restoration of three old shellac records of
>> Navarra Jotas (the first recording of jotas) and I have a lot of
>> problems. A lot of the "noise" have the same frequences ranges that the
>> voices.
>>
>> I would very grateful to Harry explain us what "computer application
>> that can actually detect what is music and what is surface noise and
>> completely delete the latter without touching the former" ?
>>
>> I've tried with Bias SoundSoap Pro 2 denoiser, and also iZotope
>> restoration suite. And I have medium results.
>>
>> Thank you for your help and answers.
>