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     Hi all,

   I bought a dozen   8 inch cinder blocks for a stand for my  
turntable.  I stacked them in a 16 by  24  configuration , four high,  
staggered with tar impregnated sheathing in between each layer; Upsom  
board is the same but more expensive.

   I dried them in the shop for a week or so before I painted them.  
Latex paint is fine and cheap. The TAS did a great job of decoupling   
the floor from the table. The four layers of cinder blocks separated  
by the TAS didn't hurt either.

   Mass is  where it's at! If it's too heavy to vibrate it can only  
absorb  vibration.

      As far as the  health hazard is concerned, unless I work in a  
hospital, don't smoke, drink or associate with anyone who does--don't  
eat fast food, drink milk from cows who are around other cows that  
flatulate I think I can live with a few health hazards; but as Dennis  
Miller says,"I may be wrong."

    BTW, I remember my grandmother making lye soap in her basement.  
That was in 1948 when people were self reliant.

     Corey, sorry for the tangent, as it's been one of those days<*>

   Ken , KF tooling & Design.


On Mar 16, 2010, at 8:43 PM, Joel Ackerman wrote:

> Another hand, as well as after college.  And I painted them.   
> Bright red-orange.  Still have them in the garage for storing stuff.
> ----- Original Message ----- From: "Corey Bailey" <[log in to unmask]>
> To: <[log in to unmask]>
> Sent: Tuesday, March 16, 2010 4:27 PM
> Subject: [ARSCLIST] Cinder block shelving
>
>
>> Hand raised.
>>
>> Oh yeah, I used the same construction method a couple of times  
>> since then. Also
>> used stained cinder blocks as speaker stands. I cemented felt on  
>> the ends to
>> protect the bottom of the speakers and wood floor.
>>
>> Now I find out that the lye used to make the darn things can  
>> become airborne and
>> is a health hazard if all of the surfaces aren't painted.
>>
>> How many actually painted your cinder blocks?
>>
>> Cheers!
>>
>> Corey
>> Corey Bailey Audio Engineering
>>
>> Quoting Michael Biel <[log in to unmask]>:
>>
>>> OK, show of hands.  How many of you used boards and cinderblocks or
>>> bricks to build your college dorm bookshelves?
>>>
>>> Mike (wishing the steel shelving he used to use was still available)
>>> Biel  [log in to unmask]
>>>
>>>
>>>
>>> George Brock-Nannestad wrote:
>>> > From: Patent Tactics, George Brock-Nannestad
>>> >
>>> > Brandon Burke asked:
>>> >
>>> >
>>> >> Anyone else think it's ironic (sad even?) that a thread  
>>> originally >> about
>>> >> preservation and long-term
>>> >> housing solutions has turned into a discussion of milk crate
>>> technologies..
>>> >>
>>> >
>>> > ----- I for one don't. Because the query was about an instant  
>>> problem, > not
>>>
>>> > about preservation and long-term housing at all. People reacted  
>>> on > their
>>> gut
>>> > feeling and saw "long term", so their posts were just as  
>>> misguided. And
>>> > reacting by going into fibre-glass reinforced milk crates is  
>>> just as
>>> > relevant.
>>> >
>>> > I think that we may have information overload, but from free >  
>>> association
>>> > something good may still come. People used plywood in the old  
>>> days (see > the
>>>
>>> > original post), and the fortuitous fact that certain milk  
>>> crates are
>>> actually
>>> > also very good for housing records with stiff covers shows that  
>>> when > there
>>>
>>> > was a demand outside the archiving world, elements useful in  
>>> archiving
>>> became
>>> > much cheaper. However, only one ARSCLIST poster really made  
>>> good use of
>>> them.
>>> > And this is the eternal problem of archiving: we have to rely  
>>> on > technology
>>>
>>> > originally developed for other purposes, because there is so  
>>> little
>>> prestige
>>> > in archiving that there is no funding for buying tailor-made  
>>> solutions.
>>> >
>>> > On another list a reference to a most relevant document has  
>>> been > posted,
>>> and
>>> > I recommend it heartily, although I have not finished reading  
>>> it. It is
>>> > available at:
>>> >
>>> > http://brtf.sdsc.edu/biblio/BRTF_Final_Report.pdf
>>> >
>>> > and it is called "Sustainable Economics for a Digital Planet".  
>>> It is > very
>>> > sobering reading. Fortunately, in other places there are still  
>>> those > who
>>> work
>>> > on an easily accessible and durable (non-migration-requiring)  
>>> medium. > It is
>>>
>>> > my personal view that that is the only long-term viable solution.
>>> >
>>> > Kind regards,
>>> >
>>> >
>>> > George
>>> >
>>> >
>>> >
>>> >> ----- Original Message ----- >> From: "Steven C. Barr"  
>>> <[log in to unmask]>
>>> >> To: [log in to unmask]
>>> >> Sent: Monday, March 15, 2010 8:14:28 PM GMT -08:00 US/Canada  
>>> Pacific
>>> >> Subject: Re: [ARSCLIST] 16" transcription disc housing &  
>>> moving audio
>>> >> collections
>>> >>
>>> >> ----- Original Message ----- >> From: "Michael Biel"  
>>> <[log in to unmask]>
>>> >>
>>> >>> Thornton Hagert wrote:
>>> >>>
>>> >>>> Oh, for the Good-Old-Days when milk-crates were milk-crates !
>>> >>>>
>>> >>>>
>>> >>>>
>>> >>> Not really. They were made of wire then and totally  
>>> unsuitable for
>>> >>> anything but glass quart bottles. .
>>> >>>
>>> >>>
>>> >> I actually have one of those "wire" milk boxes out in my  
>>> garage! As >> you
>>> >> note, it isn't good for 78's. The "golden age" of milk boxes  
>>> was in >> the
>>> >> mid-seventies, at least in the Toronto area...Sealtest used  
>>> what look >> to
>>> >> be fiberglas boxes, which are VERY durable...they were red in  
>>> colour.
>>> >> There was a "second issue" of the newer smaller boxes...these  
>>> are very
>>> >> hard to find, and are green in colour...! However, I was given  
>>> about >> 300
>>> >> or so of the red ones, by a variety-store owner...he had been  
>>> "caught"
>>> >> with them when the size was changed, and as a result the dairy  
>>> no >> longer
>>> >> wanted them (nor would they pay his deposit on them...!).
>>> >>
>>> >> Steven C. Barr
>>> >>
>>> >>
>>> >> -- >> Brandon Burke
>>> >> Archivist for Recorded Sound Collections
>>> >> Hoover Institution Archives
>>> >> Stanford University
>>> >> Stanford, CA 94305-6010
>>> >> vox: 650.724.9711
>>> >> fax: 650.725.3445
>>> >> email: [log in to unmask]
>>> >>
>>> >
>>> >
>>> >