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Hand raised.

Oh yeah, I used the same construction method a couple of times since then. Also
used stained cinder blocks as speaker stands. I cemented felt on the ends to
protect the bottom of the speakers and wood floor.

Now I find out that the lye used to make the darn things can become airborne and
 is a health hazard if all of the surfaces aren't painted.

How many actually painted your cinder blocks?

Cheers!

Corey
Corey Bailey Audio Engineering

Quoting Michael Biel <[log in to unmask]>:

> OK, show of hands.  How many of you used boards and cinderblocks or 
> bricks to build your college dorm bookshelves?
> 
> Mike (wishing the steel shelving he used to use was still available) 
> Biel  [log in to unmask] 
> 
> 
> 
> George Brock-Nannestad wrote:
> > From: Patent Tactics, George Brock-Nannestad
> >
> > Brandon Burke asked:
> >
> >   
> >> Anyone else think it's ironic (sad even?) that a thread originally about
> >> preservation and long-term 
> >> housing solutions has turned into a discussion of milk crate
> technologies..
> >>     
> >
> > ----- I for one don't. Because the query was about an instant problem, not
> 
> > about preservation and long-term housing at all. People reacted on their
> gut 
> > feeling and saw "long term", so their posts were just as misguided. And 
> > reacting by going into fibre-glass reinforced milk crates is just as 
> > relevant. 
> >
> > I think that we may have information overload, but from free association 
> > something good may still come. People used plywood in the old days (see the
> 
> > original post), and the fortuitous fact that certain milk crates are
> actually 
> > also very good for housing records with stiff covers shows that when there
> 
> > was a demand outside the archiving world, elements useful in archiving
> became 
> > much cheaper. However, only one ARSCLIST poster really made good use of
> them. 
> > And this is the eternal problem of archiving: we have to rely on technology
> 
> > originally developed for other purposes, because there is so little
> prestige 
> > in archiving that there is no funding for buying tailor-made solutions.
> >
> > On another list a reference to a most relevant document has been posted,
> and 
> > I recommend it heartily, although I have not finished reading it. It is 
> > available at:
> >
> > http://brtf.sdsc.edu/biblio/BRTF_Final_Report.pdf
> >
> > and it is called "Sustainable Economics for a Digital Planet". It is very 
> > sobering reading. Fortunately, in other places there are still those who
> work 
> > on an easily accessible and durable (non-migration-requiring) medium. It is
> 
> > my personal view that that is the only long-term viable solution.
> >
> > Kind regards,
> >
> >
> > George
> >
> >
> >   
> >> ----- Original Message ----- 
> >> From: "Steven C. Barr" <[log in to unmask]> 
> >> To: [log in to unmask] 
> >> Sent: Monday, March 15, 2010 8:14:28 PM GMT -08:00 US/Canada Pacific 
> >> Subject: Re: [ARSCLIST] 16" transcription disc housing & moving audio
> >> collections 
> >>
> >> ----- Original Message ----- 
> >> From: "Michael Biel" <[log in to unmask]> 
> >>     
> >>> Thornton Hagert wrote: 
> >>>       
> >>>> Oh, for the Good-Old-Days when milk-crates were milk-crates ! 
> >>>>
> >>>>
> >>>>         
> >>> Not really. They were made of wire then and totally unsuitable for 
> >>> anything but glass quart bottles. . 
> >>>
> >>>       
> >> I actually have one of those "wire" milk boxes out in my garage! As you 
> >> note, it isn't good for 78's. The "golden age" of milk boxes was in the 
> >> mid-seventies, at least in the Toronto area...Sealtest used what look to 
> >> be fiberglas boxes, which are VERY durable...they were red in colour. 
> >> There was a "second issue" of the newer smaller boxes...these are very 
> >> hard to find, and are green in colour...! However, I was given about 300 
> >> or so of the red ones, by a variety-store owner...he had been "caught" 
> >> with them when the size was changed, and as a result the dairy no longer 
> >> wanted them (nor would they pay his deposit on them...!). 
> >>
> >> Steven C. Barr 
> >>
> >>
> >> -- 
> >> Brandon Burke 
> >> Archivist for Recorded Sound Collections 
> >> Hoover Institution Archives 
> >> Stanford University 
> >> Stanford, CA 94305-6010 
> >> vox: 650.724.9711 
> >> fax: 650.725.3445 
> >> email: [log in to unmask] 
> >>     
> >
> >
> >   
>