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Wow, What an interesting article. I would have loved to see a picture of
this contraption, but its quite fascinating to almost get in the mind of a
1800's inventor.

 Thanks for sharing!
Peter

On Sun, Apr 18, 2010 at 10:57 PM, Punto <[log in to unmask]> wrote:

> It may take some effort to copy the following as an uninterrupted URL, but
> if you can do it, you will be able to read a Google Book entry from the
> Journal of the Society of Arts that is somewhat reminiscent of
> Leonville-Scott's work (and just bit of Rube Goldberg):
>
>
> http://books.google.com/books?id=8AIwAAAAYAAJ&pg=PA12&lpg=PA12&dq=stenographic
>
> +letter&source=bl&ots=IM3sN-sx5d&sig=iUYcbAcl4hH9WT6iNTFJxVbVkNU&hl=en&ei=KtDES9fmPIH_8Aafu9TADw&sa=X&oi=book_result&ct=result&resnum=9&ved=0CDEQ6AEwCA#v=onepa
>
> If you cannot make this work, try putting "Stenographic letter" into a
> Google search. This what I was looking for, in a quest completely unrelated
> to sound recording or archiving, when the above link popped up.
>
> What it shared with Scott is the focus on the recording of sound (speech)
> in graphic form, apparently without thought of reconstituting the recorded
> sound in an audible format. The images that Mr. Almgill's narrative summon
> up are pretty humorous, and it seems that he was venturing out on a tangent
> by tracing the movement of the lips and tongue rather than the vibrations of
> the vocal cord, but I found it interesting to see the workings of an
> obviously inventive mind of the mid 19th century.
>
> All my best,
>
> Peter Hirsch
> NYPL
>