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The big problem I read from the somewhat poorly-written newspaper story is that the collection is 
large and mostly common reissue LPs. So it has little value, even to scholars. This sounds like 450 
boxes of mostly dollar-bin records. The university seems to have made a correct decision, given 
limited resources and time.

The lesson here for people on this list -- an accumulation of numbers is not a collection in the 
useful sense. Careful culling and careful selection of what makes up your collection makes it 
valuable and worthwhile. A huge pile of disorganized and common old records is not of much use to 
anyone. Also, as time goes on, condition matters more and more. If you've cared for your collection, 
it will be of more value to someone other than you.

All of this is hard to hear by some old guy who's spent years accumulating, but it's how it is 
today -- and frankly how it's been ever thus. I'm hoping that academia and other endowed 
repositories are concluding that numbers don't matter, it's quality and focus that matters in a 
collection. Much better to have a little pail of golden wheat than a silo of chaffe.

-- Tom Fine

----- Original Message ----- 
From: "Mark Durenberger" <[log in to unmask]>
To: <[log in to unmask]>
Sent: Thursday, April 15, 2010 9:17 AM
Subject: Re: [ARSCLIST] The trials of trying to give away a record collection


> >From the perspective of a Museum operative (Pavek) it should be noted that
> in today's environment it's difficult to accept a collection without also finding the funding for 
> the collection's preservation.  It's too bad, but that's often the situation...
>
> Regards,
>
> Mark Durenberger
>
> --------------------------------------------------
> From: "Richard L. Hess" <[log in to unmask]>
>
>> http://www.winnipegfreepress.com/local/u-of-m-rejects-massive-donation-of-recordings-90816414.html
>>
>> The University of Manitoba first accepted and then rejected a donation of 56,500 discs. Some 
>> points in the article don't seem to hold up (like dates and record types), but here is a 
>> collection of 56,500 discs dating back to 1913 that appears to be looking for a home. Cheers, 
>> Richard
>