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The saving grace may be the low power radio stations that have popped up 
all over the place. The Feds freed up licenses for LP stations about 8 
years ago and they have been proliferating. We have at least two 
currently on Maui, both of which have a whopping 50 watts of broadcast 
power (which means line-of-sight reception only). One of them, Mana'o 
Radio - KEAO-LP 91.5 FM - not only allows it's sometime quirky DJs to 
program all their own material, and has a streaming website, but has a 
studio where they not only broadcast live but record material both live 
and for release as well. No disc cutters, though! Yet.
Mal

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Robert Cham wrote:
> Unfortunately it's not only it's not only the advance of technology 
> that governs the making of recordings.  Radio stations used to make a 
> lot of the live recordings.  The move away from broadcasting any music 
> not interesting to the average 12 year old and copyright issues have 
> severely limited this practice.  The last copyright law revision in 
> particular, has caused almost as many problems for recording as for 
> webcasting.
>
> Bob Cham
>
>
>> << a classical pianist once, when the man
>>>  was in his 70's. Somehow we got on the subject of how he'd be 
>>> remembered
>>>  and he glumly noted that
>>>  his recordings would stand far longer than the experience of seeing 
>>> him in
>>>  concert. Yet, he had
>>>  spent thousands more hours performing in concert -- and he believed 
>>> he had
>>>  performed every single
>>>  work he had done best in concert -- than in front of microphones 
>>> making
>>>  records. So you can see how
>>>  this is the classic example of "sampling" first-person experiences and
>>>  calling it history.   >>
>>>
>> Do we know definitively if some of these live performances were in 
>> some way
>> recorded?   As electronic media advance, more and more recordings of
>> events, communications and images will exist and many will hopefully get
>> preserved.
>>
>> Best,
>>
>> Dave Radlauer
>> www.JAZZHOTBigstep.com
>