Print

Print


It's perhaps good that despite "Gramophone"  (& its other spellings)
remained a relatively exotic term here in the USA.  Otherwise "Grammies"
might have been called "Phonies".  I'm hopefully not plagiarizing the
gag...I've used it before..

Shiffy

On Wed, May 19, 2010 at 11:50 AM, <[log in to unmask]> wrote:

>
> In a message dated 5/19/2010 1:03:59 A.M. Eastern Daylight Time,
> [log in to unmask] writes:
>
> the  Victor firm (and their "ancestor," Berliner) were using, and may have
> held the  rights, to the name "Gramophone?" Early in the 20th centurym
> "phonograph"  refered to Edison's cylinder machines; again, he may have
> held
> rights to that  term?
>
>
>
> ---------------------
> nix to Edison's use of "phonograph", no trademark protection.
>
> Eldridge Johnson had been (temporarily) enjoined in Mar of 1901 (by Frank
> Seaman) from using term Gramophone, and that is why Victor eschewed the
> word
> in  Oct 1901, i.e. Victor Talking Machine Co. However, the word soon became
>  generic.
>
>  The word Graphophone (to Edison's annoyance) had also become a  category
> at the patent office.
>
> Allen
>
>