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In a message dated 5/19/2010 11:36:43 P.M. Eastern Daylight Time,  
[log in to unmask] writes:

I'm  surprised that Edison didn't try to
protect "phonograph" (didn't he patent  it as such in 1878?);


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A patent does not convey 'protection' for a brand name, or inventive  
category, etc. The word 'phonograph' had been used since the 1830's in a variety  
of contexts, sometimes involving systems of shorthand, but was also used as 
a  synonym for the (Scott's) Phonautograph, and the Scientific American  
specifically referred to a projected recording/reproducing machine  
("phonograph") in 1867.
 
  The Columbia Graphophone Mfg Co of Bridgeport finally got around to  
trademarking the word "Graphophone" in 1921, claiming their first  commercial 
use in Jan 1887. (acc to ToRS).
 
  The word "Graphophone" was first used (in their Notebooks) by  A. G. Bell 
(and C. S. Tainter) in early 1881.
 
Allen
 _www.phonobooks.com_ (http://www.phonobooks.com)