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From: Patent Tactics, George Brock-Nannestad

Hi Shiffy,

ah, it is difficult to express oneself clearly on technical matters, so I am 
happy (as will be a number of readers, whereas others could not care less) 
that you have taken the trouble to list the various stages in traditional 
record manufacture

You wrote:
> 
> Yes, it could be a dub from a master tape or a 33.33 original.  I doubt
> the
> latter because the high end's so clean.

----- this is not what I meant. I meant that if you hold a playable lacquer 
in your hand and you are not going to have it mastered, then it is not a 
master from an issued record. It would have been damaged in the process. Your 
original post asked about issued records, the way I read it. But if the 
project was not completed, then it may still make an issued record after due 
processing, and then it is a master. On the other hand, the lacquer you hold 
in your hand could have been dubbed onto the master that was later indeed 
used for processing, you would not be able to see that, and your lacquer 
would be tied to an issued record anyway.

> 
> I did about 1,000 acetates (16" sessions) & 78 formatted masters, also - &
> +
> metal parts (for Tuff City & know the appearance of each..  About jargon:
> what terms (if different) designate an acetate for a 78 that's completely
> formatted for pressing (with lead in & lead out grooves).
> 
> 1. an original first gen. acetate

----- by this I suppose you mean direct-to-disc or "live"

> 
> versus
> 
> 2. dubbed from a tape or disk such as a 16" session

----- by this I suppose you mean what Columbia did for a long time

> 
> Acetates such as 1 & 2  would have been plated & then made into  -a -
> "master" (I've seen these called "fathers" in Europe), then  + "mothers"
> and finally  "-stampers"
> 
> Note that in this email "-" = negative grooves & "+" = positive (readily
> playable) grooves.
> 
> I presume that this is not a private use dub: that'd have most likely been
> cut  on a 12" or 10" acetate.

----- exactly! Unless someone had come across a cache of discs that were 
considered too hardened to use for mastering. But the 10" layout is puzzling, 
because processing 10" records from a 13" master lacquer is more complicated.

Anyway, my activities with mastering and processing have really been limited 
to the coarse-groove format.

> 
> I run the "-'s" backwards & use Stanton Bi-Pointed Radial Styli given to
> me
> years ago
> by George Alexandrovich.  Is anyone now making them?

----- no, and the last were sold from Stanton a couple of years ago. How do 
you get the bi-furcated stylus to ride on the ridge? Do you do it with the 
turntable stationary and crank it up?

> 
> For the Tuff City metal parts, "fathers" & "mothers" were unplated copper.

----- most likely these are now tarnished

> The stampers were chrome plated copper.

Kind regards,


George

-------------------------------------

> 
> On Wed, May 5, 2010 at 12:49 PM, George Brock-Nannestad
> <[log in to unmask]>wrote:
> 
> > From: Patent Tactics, George Brock-Nannestad
> >
> > Hello,
> >
> > Art Shifrin wrote:
> >
> >
> > >  It's definitely a 78 master.
> > >
> > > So, I'm still in need of info.
> >
> > ----- if you have it in your hand it was not a master, but it may have
> been
> > dubbed to a master. It is probably a take that did not make it. The
> reason
> > I
> > would not think that it is copy for private use is that it seems to
> adhere
> > to
> > 10" dimensions, although the lacquer is for a 12" master.
> >
> > Kind regards,
> >
> >
> > George
> >
> > > On Wed, May 5, 2010 at 11:20 AM, Michael Biel <[log in to unmask]> wrote:
> > >
> > > > Check out David Diehl's Blue Pages at hensteeth.com   He has
> detailed
> > > > all known 78 rpm party records, and yours probably fit into this
> > > > category.  He will probably want to know the details of your
> lacquers
> > > > because they might be masters, or of course they might just be dubs
> > that
> > > > many people made of the sometimes hard to get original pressings.
> > > >
> > > > Mike Biel  [log in to unmask]
> > > >
> > > >
> > > >
> > > >
> > > > From: Art Shifrin <[log in to unmask]>
> > > > > Iīve obtained some 13" 78 rpm lateral cut lacquers. One thatīs
> > > > interesting
> > > > > & entertaining is a C&W comic song, apparently entitled "My Grand
> > > Mother
> > > > > Canīt Jump That High". "3004-A" is scribed at the center.
> > > >
> > > > > The formatīs for a 10" disk with appropriate lead in & lead out
> > > grooves.
> > > > > Might any of you know or deduce the label for which this was cut,
> the
> > > > > approximate or actual date of recording, & the artistsī names?
> > > > > Thanks,  Art (Shiffy) Shifrin
> > > >
> >