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That's because he was merely an oboist in the orchestra. No arranging, no producing. 
 
Cary Ginell
 
> Date: Tue, 3 Aug 2010 19:53:12 -0700
> From: [log in to unmask]
> Subject: Re: [ARSCLIST] Mitch Miller RIP
> To: [log in to unmask]
> 
> John Hammond's reputation is safe.I'd like to know more about his time at 
> Mercury's classical division.There seems to be little,if any, information out 
> there on this.
> 
> What is this chamber music record he recorded for Mercury?
> 
> I was not aware of his involvement with any of the Charlie Parker strings 
> recordings.He is not credited either on the Mercury,or the early 
> Norgran/Clef/Verve issues.
> 
> 
> Roger
> 
> 
> ________________________________
> From: Tom Fine <[log in to unmask]>
> To: [log in to unmask]
> Sent: Tue, August 3, 2010 11:58:50 AM
> Subject: [ARSCLIST] Mitch Miller RIP
> 
> In the (few) obits I've read for Mitch Miller, I didn't see any mention of his 
> early role in Mercury Records, which was important for the young independent 
> company. Miller was an oboe player, Eastman School trained. He was hired at 
> Mercury by John Hammond and he, Hammond and David Hall comprised the company's 
> earliest classical-music staff. Miller recorded an album of oboe/chamber 
> orchestra music for Mercury, as well as worked on the "Charlie Parker with 
> Strings" sessions for Norman Granz. At that time, Granz was affiliated with 
> Mercury.
> 
> After Miller went to Columbia and, among many other things, founded the famous 
> 30th Street studio, he continued to moonlight with other projects. One on-going 
> thing for him in the 50's and 60's was conducting, arranging and producing 
> sessions for Little Golden Book kiddie records. He did some of these sessions at 
> Fine Sound and then Fine Recording.
> 
> Some of the obits and tributes struck me as very ironic. Miller was portrayed as 
> this old fuddy-duddy of suburbia in the age of rock and roll with his sing-along 
> show. The goatee should have slain that myth. Both Miller and Hammond were 
> cutting-edge dudes in their time, very much on the forefront of music and 
> intellectual thought, and far left of the mainstream in their social and 
> political views. They were progressives before there was such a term.
> 
> Mitch Miller did much for the music business, and for Mercury and then Columbia 
> Records. May he rest in peace.
> 
> -- Tom Fine
> 
> 
> 
>