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Well- there's always Carnegie Hall.

Also, perhaps some room in the Brill Building or some sutch.

Steve Smolian


----- Original Message ----- 
From: "Tom Fine" <[log in to unmask]>
To: <[log in to unmask]>
Sent: Friday, November 19, 2010 1:49 PM
Subject: Re: [ARSCLIST] Interesting recording history tidbit


> OK, so maybe the claim about 799 7th Avenue is true -- the only studio 
> space in use from the acoustical into the digital eras?
>
> ----- Original Message ----- 
> From: "Mike Gray" <[log in to unmask]>
> To: <[log in to unmask]>
> Sent: Friday, November 19, 2010 1:46 PM
> Subject: Re: [ARSCLIST] Interesting recording history tidbit
>
>
>> EMI's Studios on Abbey Road were built in 1931.
>>
>> Mike Gray
>>
>> Tom Fine wrote:
>>> Here's a piece of trivia for you on a Friday ...
>>>
>>> From the booklet for the 3-CD set "Early Ellington: The Complete 
>>> Brunswick and Vocalion Recordings of Duke Ellington, 1926-1931" (p.10):
>>>
>>> "All of the sessions were recorded at Brunswick's New York studio at 799 
>>> Seventh Avenue. The studio, which first opened in 1924, had a remarkable 
>>> history: after Brunswick Records moved out at the end of 1931, it was 
>>> used as a transcription studio (1932-4), then by Decca Records 
>>> (1934-35), Columbia Records (1940-65) and finally A&R Studios (1966-84). 
>>> It holds the distinction of being the only studio location in America 
>>> and possibly the world to have been active from the acoustical to the 
>>> digital recording eras. Ellington recorded there on various occasions in 
>>> the 1920s, '30s, '40s, '50s and '60s."
>>>
>>> As for the claim about the technology span, was HMV's Abbey Road studio 
>>> built in the acoustic era?
>>>
>>> -- Tom Fine
>>
>