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From: Patent Tactics, George Brock-Nannestad


Hello again,

Milan wrote about less clicks etc from a standard Shure needle. I do not 
doubt it; the ELP does seem to provide more clicks. However, these are "raw" 
in the best sense of the word, they do no damage by exciting the stylus 
suspension and creating a distorted click waveform. This is why ELP has had 
such success by offering what is essentially a slimmed-down model of a CEDAR 
de-clicker.

Kind regards,


George

P.S. I forgot to say that scratching is not possible on the ELP - everything 
is enclosed.

----------------------------------------------


> Hello,
> 
> regarding this subject and especially ELP machines, it is matter of (so
> much
> expensive) trial and decision of transfer strategy. One friend of mine in
> Bulgaria who owns the ELP unit (as well as "classical" turntable) put some
> RAW transfers of the very same ordinary, slightly worn 78 rpm record 
> transferred by
> both machines.
> 
> It is interesting that ordinary setup (he used "standard" Shure needle)
> produced result with less clicks and craquelures.
> 
> So here are those samples, anyone judge for himself:
> 
> http://files.mail.ru/HYQ8W2
> 
> (wave files, compressed by zip archiver)
> 
> Best wishes,
> 
> Milan
> 
> 
> 
> 
> 
> 
> ----- Original Message ----- 
> From: "George Brock-Nannestad" <[log in to unmask]>
> To: <[log in to unmask]>
> Sent: Tuesday, January 04, 2011 10:57 PM
> Subject: Re: [ARSCLIST] Technics apparently really has discontinued their
> turntables
> 
> 
> > From: Patent Tactics, George Brock-Nannestad
> >
> >
> > Hi,
> >
> > turntables vs. historic machines:
> >
> > I do use a portable wind-up HMV gramophone for demo purposes and to
> prove
> > the
> > fabulous quality you can get from records made for them (excepting organ
> > records), due to the scientific approach by Maxfield and Harrison.
> >
> > But I confess that for listening (and analytical listening) I am happy
> to
> > use
> > the ELP Laser Turntable. I have a fair number of vinyl pressings of 78s,
> > and
> > I rejoice every time that there is absolutely no wear. And most shellacs
> > also
> > play well. I do not have to change stylus, I do not have to replace worn
> > stylii, and the clicks are easily tamed, because they are much cleaner
> > than
> > what most, even moving coil pickups will provide. I can adjust the depth
> > of
> > tracing during replay, and I can adjust the rpm. I can repeat a groove
> > endlessly, with just a delimiting click once per cycle. Ah, bliss!!
> >
> > I had a stupid dealer in antique records send me a rare record, and he
> > must
> > have been drunk while packing the record, because the pack was designed
> to
> > put uneven stress on the record. He instantly paid me back everything,
> > including shipping, but like Kodak, there was no replacement for
> content.
> > I
> > can easily fit the shards on the ELP turntable, let it run and reproduce
> > the
> > content for me, albeit with clicks that need more work to clean up. But
> my
> > old-time painstaking repair of records is now of the past.
> >
> > However, we have not solved the problem with peeling lacquer records.
> >
> > Best wishes,
> >
> >
> > George
> >
> > ----------------------------------
> >
> >
> >> I've also owned antiques machines in the past and enjoyed hearing a 78
> >> as might have been heard in its day, but I must argue that one doesn't
> >> hear it with the same ears as someone who lived in that day. A machine
> >> such as an Edison player was probably regarded as what we now call
> >> "state of the art" or "high tech". A mind blowing experience. To us it
> >> is an antique and a curiosity, a charming and quaint item. hopefully
> >> appreciated for its role in the history of home music. To a
> contemporary
> >> listener, it may have been regarded as the ultimate home listening
> >> experience, second only to live music.
> >>
> >> Perhaps the way to understand a little about how they must have felt in
> >> that day by comparing it to the first time you saw a 60" HD screen
> >> playing a blu-ray disc movie. You can't help but be blown away.
> >>
> >> joe salerno
> >>
> >>
> >> On 1/4/2011 8:36 AM, David Breneman wrote:
> >> > --- On Tue, 1/4/11, Tom Fine<[log in to unmask]>  wrote:
> >> >
> >> >> That said, I bet I'm not the only one who buys cheap and
> >> >> common but musically-enjoyable 78's specifically to play on
> >> >> the Victrola. They are never intended for transfer or
> >> >> preservation, they are intended to allow me to enjoy my
> >> >> antique Victrola. I'm sure others do similar things for
> >> >> their cylinder players and Diamond Disc players.
> >> >
> >> > Guilty as charged.  There's something to be said for the
> >> > "time machine" aspect of seeing and hearing a record played
> >> > as a person would have experienced it "back in the day."
> >> > An old machine puts on a good show; an mp3 doesn't.
> >> >
> >> >
> >> >
> >> >
> >> >
> >> >